The Urban League Of Greater Chattanooga Hosts Corporate Job Fair

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

The Urban League of Greater Chattanooga will hold a Corporate Job Fair on Tueday., April 30, from 9 a.m. to noon, at the Urban League Office, 730 M.L. King Blvd., Chattanooga. 

The Urban League partners with company representatives from TVA, EPB, VW, BCBST, Komatsu, LJT Steel, Chattem, Erlanger and other local companies to get Chattanoogans back to work.  All of the participating companies are in need of qualified candidates to fill current full and part-time positions.  Job seekers must be 18 years of age or older and have a consistent work history for three or more years.

“At our last job fair we had twenty companies represented and more than three hundred people hand out resumes and inquiry about employment opportunities.  We put job seekers face to face with employers who are in need of people looking to fill positions in technology, management, sales, engineering, marketing, healthcare and customer service,” said Julia Anderson, Workforce Development manager.

“BCBST enjoys participating in Urban League’s Corporate Job Fair each year.  It gives us an opportunity to get out into the community and meet candidates face-to-face to discuss our career opportunities,” said Kim Nash-Lawley, Talent Acquisition consultant.

The job fair is open to the public, and registration is required. Attendees are encouraged to dress professionally and bring at least five copies of their resume. A pre-registration form is available online at www.ulchatt.net.  For more information, call 423 756-1762, ext. 16.



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