Dr. Perry Brickman To Speak At Documentary Screening At Jewish Cultural Center On May 6

Sunday, April 28, 2013

The Jewish Federation of Greater Chattanooga invites the Chattanooga community to a dessert reception and screen of the acclaimed documentary From Silence to Recognition: Confronting Discrimination in Emory’s Dental School History on Monday, May 6 at 7 p.m. at the Jewish Cultural Center, 5461 North Terrace Road. There is no cost to attend, but please RSVP.

Chattanooga native Dr. Perry Brickman will tell his story of discrimination at Emory’s School of Dentistry when he introduces the film. Dr. Brickman, a graduate of the University of Tennessee who had a long career as an oral surgeon, was one of many Jewish students who “flunked out” of Emory’s now defunct School of Dentistry between 1948 and 1961 as a result of anti-Semitism. Brickman knew what was going on at the time, but when he saw a bar graph in a 2006 exhibit on Jews at Emory documenting failure rates of Jewish dental students, he took action. He worked with the Anti-Defamation League to obtain additional research, and he conducted video interviews with other Jewish students.  When Emory Vice President Gary Hauk saw Dr. Brickman’s research, Mr. Hauk hired father-son documentary filmmakers David Hughes Duke and John Duke to shoot From Silence to Recognition. Dr. Brickman will talk about his experience making the film.

This special evening, which is free to attendees, is hosted by the Jewish Federation’s Community Relations Committee along with Claire Binder, Anita and Lawrence Levine, Helen Pregulman, Pris and Robert Siskin, and Elaine and Sanford Winer. Please RSVP to 493-0270 ext. 10 or rsvp@jewishchattanooga.com.

The Jewish Federation of Greater Chattanooga and its programs are open to everyone regardless of religious affiliation.  The Jewish Federation builds and fosters a strong unified Jewish community and strives to ensure its well-being and continuity locally, in Israel, and throughout the world. 

 



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