Tennessee Cut Funding For State Pre-K In 2012 Says National Report

Monday, April 29, 2013
Across the country, state funding for pre-K decreased by more than half a billion dollars in 2011-2012, the largest one-year drop ever, says a new study from the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER), which has tracked state pre-K since 2002.
 
The State of Preschool 2012 yearbook cited two other “firsts”: After a decade of growth, enrollment in state pre-K has stalled. And despite stagnant enrollment, state funding per child fell to $3,841 — well below the $5,020 (inflation-adjusted) national average in 2001-2002.
 
Tennessee spent $240 less per child in 2011 – 2012 than the previous year when adjusted for inflation. Even so, its ranking nationally improved from 15th to 13th, largely due to larger funding declines in other states. There was a slight improvement in access ranking as the state moved from 20th to 19th due to a small increase in enrollment of 4-year-olds in 2011-2012.
 
The quality of Tennessee’s pre-K program is high, achieving nine of NIEER’s 10 benchmarks for quality standards. Research from Vanderbilt University shows that the program has substantial positive effects on children’s language, literacy and math skills. NIEER director Steve Barnett said the $1.2 million increase in the state’s 2013 budget for state pre-K is barely adequate to keep pace with inflation.
 
“Even though the nation is emerging from the Great Recession, it is clear that the nation’s youngest learners are still bearing the brunt of the budget cuts,” Mr. Barnett said. Reductions were widespread with 27 of 40 states with pre-K programs reporting funding per child declined in 2011-2012.
 
The adverse consequences of declining funding were manifested in a retrenchment in program quality as well. Seven programs lost ground against benchmarks for quality standards while only three gained. Only 15 states plus the District of Columbia provided enough funding per-child to meet all 10 benchmarks for quality standards. And, only 20 percent of all children enrolled in state-funded pre-K attend those programs. More than half a million children, or 42 percent of nationwide enrollment, were served by programs that met fewer than half of NIEER’s quality standards benchmarks.
 

Officials said, "Education in the years before kindergarten plays an important role in preparing our youngest citizens for productive lives in the global economy. Yet, our nation’s public investment in their future through pre-K declined during the recent economic downturn at the very time that parents’ financial capacity to invest in their children was hardest hit. America will pay the price of that lapse for decades to come." 

Mr. Barnett also noted that “while the recession greatly exacerbated the decline in funding, there was already a general trend in the states toward declining funding for quality.” He said in this respect, President Obama’s new universal pre-K proposal is especially timely. “We have studied the President’s plan and find it provides states with strong incentives to raise quality while expanding access to pre-K. The plan will assist states already leading the way, states that lost ground during the recession, and the 10 states that still have no state-funded pre-K." 


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