Tennessee Main Street Communities Generated $82.7 Million In 2012

Monday, April 29, 2013

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development announced the 2012 Economic Impact and Reinvestment Statistics from its 24 Tennessee Main Street communities across the state.  Certified Main Street communities generated more than $82 million of public/private investment in 2012, and continue to be a vital part of the state’s economic and cultural identity.

“Continued growth and a strong foundation at a local level contributes to Tennessee’s overall livability and can greatly factor into a company’s relocation or expansion decision,” Economic and Community Development Commissioner Bill Hagerty said.

“The Main Street program facilitates focused revitalization in downtown commercial districts by providing jobs, growing the tax base and reinforcing Tennessee’s competitive lead among Southeastern states.”

Tennessee Main Street provides technical assistance and guidance for communities in developing common sense solutions to make downtowns safe, appealing, vibrant places where folks want to shop, live and make memories. Other reinvestment statistics from the 24 certified Main Street communities reporting include:

Net new jobs: 604

Net new businesses: 107

Building rehabilitation projects: 217

Public improvement projects: 304

Net new housing units: 273

Volunteer hours contributed: 117,253 (a 13 percent increase from 2011)

Total public/private investment: $82,742,898

“The annual reinvestment statistics make a strong statement about the economic activity occurring within our Tennessee Main Street program districts,” Community Development Program Director for Tennessee Main Street Todd Morgan said. “New jobs, businesses and investment, along with an impressive number of volunteer work hours, prove this community-based approach to downtown revitalization is hard at work.”

There are currently 24 certified Main Street program communities across Tennessee: Bristol, Cleveland, Collierville, Columbia, Cookeville, Dandridge, Dayton, Dyersburg, Fayetteville, Franklin, Gallatin, Greeneville, Jackson, Leiper’s Fork, Kingsport, Lawrenceburg, McMinnville, Murfreesboro, Morristown, Rogersville, Tiptonville, Savannah, Union City and Ripley.

Tennessee Main Street communities are required to meet National Accreditation standards annually, which include broad-based community support for the program, a comprehensive work plan, a sufficient operating budget and adequate staff and volunteer support. Tennessee Main Street operates under the National Main Street Center, a program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.


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