Georgia Says Deer Season Length Not Being Reduced

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Hunters and others recently may have heard one of multiple news sources claim that the deer season length was to be reduced in the 2013-2014 hunting year. This is not the case. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division wishes to address this concern and remind citizens to always check www.georgiawildlife.com/Hunting/regulations for correct information.

“The proposed regulations under consideration recommend a 25-day reduction only in the number of either-sex or ‘doe days,’ not in the length of the overall deer season,” said John Bowers, assistant chief of the Game Management Section.  “This proposed change is a result of scientific data and deer hunters will still be able to hunt bucks during either-sex days.”

Long-term data indicate a statewide decline in the fawn recruitment rate in all physiographic regions of the state.  At the same time, does have comprised 60-65% of the annual deer harvest.  Additionally, the harvest of does has increased by 13% over the past few years.  In other words, there are less deer being recruited to replenish and stabilize the deer population.  The broad trend of declining fawn recruitment rates coupled with high levels of doe harvest warrant a statewide regulatory action.

Additionally, as indicated by a marked increase in public dissatisfaction related to antlerless deer harvest, declines in deer density have become an issue of concern among many deer hunters in Georgia.

“We believe the proposed reduction in either-sex days strikes a reasonable balance between diverse hunter desires while attempting to address statewide biological concerns,” said Mr. Bowers.  “There is no proposal that will satisfy everyone.  The Department has done its best to develop a balanced proposal.  While the proposed reduction in either-sex days reduces the opportunity to harvest does, it maintains the opportunity to deer hunt and harvest antlered bucks.”

The economic impact of deer hunters and hunting activities is beneficial to the state and to conservation efforts.  Deer hunting in Georgia is responsible for more than $537 million in retail sales and supports more than 11,500 jobs.  In fact, deer hunting in Georgia has an economic impact in excess of $890 million.  Additionally, since 1939, hunters have directly contributed more than $165 million for wildlife conservation in Georgia.

Those wanting more on proposed hunting regulations should consider attending an upcoming public hearing.  Interested persons have several ways to comment on the proposed changes.  The Wildlife Resources Division has scheduled three public hearings to provide the public an opportunity to share comments on the proposed hunting regulation changes.

All meetings will begin at 7 p.m.:

·         April 23: Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, Health Sciences Building, 2802 Moore Highway, Tifton, Ga.

·         April 24: The Roberts Chapel Auditorium, State Offices South at Tift College, 300 Patrol Road, Forsyth, Ga.

·         April 25: Amicalola Electric, 544 Highway 15 South, Jasper, Ga.

Those unable to attend a meeting may submit input either electronically or in written statement form.  Input must be received by 4:30 p.m. on April 30.  Written statements should be mailed to: GA DNR/Wildlife Resources Division/Game Management Section; Attn: John W. Bowers; 2070 U.S. Highway 278, S.E.; Social Circle, Ga. 30025. Statements may be electronically submitted at: www.georgiawildlife.com/Hunting/SubmitComments.

For more information or to view the proposed regulation changes, visit www.georgiawildlife.com/Hunting/proposedregulations or contact Hunter Services at 770 761-3045.

 



A Native Fish Returns To Parksville Reservoir

Catching a trophy musky, or any size for that matter, can be an incredible angling experience. The Cumberland and Tennessee River Basins provide exciting and unique opportunities for Tennessee musky anglers. Parksville Reservoir is the latest water within the historic musky range, to be targeted for establishing a fishery.  In October, TWRA stocked 600 musky in Parksville Reservoir ... (click for more)

TVCC Presents $5,042 To Chattanooga Team River Runner

The Tennessee Valley Canoe Club (TVCC) presented a check for $5,042 to Team River Runner Chattanooga (TRR)  Saturday  evening at  the TVCC annual holiday party.  The money will be used by TRR to help wounded military veterans.  The check was presented by TVCC President Heather Curry to Julie Wright-Carlson, TRR Chattanooga Whitewater Chapter Coordinator. ... (click for more)

1 Killed, Another Injured In Shooting On The Southside Early Sunday Morning; Delivery Driver Carjacked On Southside Earlier

One person was killed and a second person injured in a shooting on the Southside early Sunday morning. The victims are Sharone Porter, 22, who was killed, and Torrie Porter, 24, who had non-life threatening injuries.  At 2:47 a.m., Chattanooga Police responded to 1400 Cowart St.  on a person shot. Upon arrival, Chattanooga Police found two victims suffering ... (click for more)

Bradley County Deputy Shoots And Kills Stabbing Suspect At Charleston

A Bradley County deputy shot and killed a man who was a suspect in a stabbing early Sunday morning. The Sheriff's Office said, "At approximately 11:54 p.m. on Saturday, a call was received at the Cleveland/Bradley County 911 Center to report a stabbing at a residence on Leyland Drive in Charleston. "The caller indicated a male had been stabbed and another male had fled from ... (click for more)

The Growing Monopoly

Over the last decade, five tech giants have risen to the top, and created, discovered and invented services and products that have made these companies worth billions today. Those five, of course, are Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. Each of these companies are responsible for several products and services that we use in our everyday lives. They have devoured the ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: The Last Day Of School

AUTHOR’S NOTE: This story first appeared in the Chattanooga News-Free Press in the late 1970s and every year about this time I am asked repeatedly about it. It is far and away the most famous story I have ever written – copies have been sent to me from numerous foreign countries, it’s included in teaching manuals and people I haven’t seen in years get in touch when they read it ... (click for more)