Grand Opening Held For New Meigs North Elementary Walking Track

Thursday, May 16, 2013

Meigs North Elementary School celebrated the grand opening of its new walking track on Monday. The track was constructed with funds provided as part of a $160,000 diabetes prevention and control grant from the Appalachian Diabetes Control and Translation Project.  Construction was completed by Jones Concrete and community partner Meigs County Highway Department. 

The Meigs County Health Council identified diabetes prevention as a need in the community and applied for the ADCTP grant.

Some funding from the grant was used to construct the track to provide a safe walking area for Meigs Elementary students and other residents in northern Meigs County.

“Parents will be encouraged to walk the track while attending student athletic practices or events, and members of the community will be welcome to use the facility for physical activity after school and on weekends,” said Connye Rowland, Coordinated School Health director with Meigs County Schools.

A recent Community Health Assessment process showed that in Meigs County, 34.6 percent of adults are physically inactive and 34.2 percent are obese.  Physical inactivity and obesity are risk factors for diabetes and walking is one way for people to reduce those risk factors.

“We are excited to have a track where students, parents and residents of the northern end of the county have a safe place to exercise,” said Health Council Chairperson Laura Smith. “The health council wants to find additional ways to help residents improve their health and we would like to have more involvement from local residents to help us find solutions that will work for people in our community.”  

The Meigs County Health Council meets on the second Friday of each month at the Decatur Town Hall in the Regions Bank Building.  For more information or to join the council, contact Beth Delaney at 634-1947.

 


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