Dalton State Rad Tech Grads Achieve 100 Percent Pass Rate On National Exam

Tuesday, May 21, 2013
Graduates include: left to right, front row, Katie Roach (Ringgold), Jennifer Angel (Blue Ridge), Cassie Watkins (Ellijay), Jennifer McCollum (Dalton), Haley Davis (Ringgold), Cara Elkins (Dalton), and Michael Alvey (East Ridge); back row, Greg Trotter (Dalton), Todd Pritchett (Chattanooga), Jake Downey (Ringgold), Christopher Gresham (Ringgold), Giovanni Castillo (Dalton), Rebecca Peters (Ellijay), Pedro Landaverde (Dalton), Molly Ramsey (Rossville), and Sarah Chance (Dalton).
Graduates include: left to right, front row, Katie Roach (Ringgold), Jennifer Angel (Blue Ridge), Cassie Watkins (Ellijay), Jennifer McCollum (Dalton), Haley Davis (Ringgold), Cara Elkins (Dalton), and Michael Alvey (East Ridge); back row, Greg Trotter (Dalton), Todd Pritchett (Chattanooga), Jake Downey (Ringgold), Christopher Gresham (Ringgold), Giovanni Castillo (Dalton), Rebecca Peters (Ellijay), Pedro Landaverde (Dalton), Molly Ramsey (Rossville), and Sarah Chance (Dalton).

For the 15th consecutive year, graduates of Dalton State’s Radiologic Technology program have achieved a 100 percent pass rate on the national certification exam administered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists.

For Program Director Susan D. West, the record is 30 consecutive years of perfect pass rates beginning at the Medical College of Georgia and then Hamilton Medical Center before she and the program moved to Dalton State in 1998. 

Radiologic Technologists are trained to use ionizing radiation for the purpose of creating x-rays or other medical images and therapeutic procedures for the diagnosis or treatment of illness or injury. The ARRT states that “Patients need to have confidence that the technologists caring for them have the credentials and qualifications to safely administer radiation and that the equipment they are using is properly calibrated and maintained to deliver radiation safely and within the proper dose parameters.”

Dalton State graduated 16 Radiologic Technology students who sat for the 200-question national exam.

“We are proud of our unbroken record of perfect pass rates on the RT exam that has been maintained since Dalton State took over this program in 1998,” said Ms. West, who also serves the College as Chair of Allied Health programs. “We believe it speaks to the preparedness of the graduates of our program and of their ability to perform competently and professionally in the workplace.”

Dalton State’s two-year Radiologic Technology program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, Director West said.

Those wishing to know more about the Radiologic Technology program at Dalton State may contact Susan West at the School of Technology at 706 272-4567.

 


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