Arts & Culture Alliance Presents Selections From AVA’s Juried Members Exhibition

Thursday, May 23, 2013
Sculpture by Matthew Dutton
Sculpture by Matthew Dutton

The Arts & Culture Alliance will present a new exhibition featuring selections from the Association for Visual Arts’ Juried Members Exhibition, featuring original art by over 20 professional and emerging artists in the Chattanooga area, including painting, etching, mixed media, sculpture, drawing, photography, and more.  

The exhibition will be displayed at the Emporium Center in downtown Knoxville from June 7-28, and an opening reception will take place as part of First Friday activities on June 7 from 5-9 p.m. with complimentary chocolate fondue provided by The Melting Pot.

For the first time in its organizational history, the Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville partners with the Association for Visual Arts in Chattanooga for the purpose of promoting local artists within each community. In January and February of 2013, AVA displayed a selection of work by 17 Knoxville-area artists in their gallery space at 30 Frazier Ave. on the Tennessee River. In exchange, the Alliance now presents this exhibition of works by AVA members at the Emporium.

“Many of our artist members are well known here in the Knoxville area,” says Liza Zenni, executive director of the Arts & Culture Alliance. “We thought Chattanooga should be exposed to their work, and we look forward to Chattanooga artists receiving extra exposure here in Knoxville.” 

The works represent a portion of AVA’s Juried Members Exhibition, as juried by Paul Lee, an artist and professor of art at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. Participating artists include in the exhibition include: Hariett Chipley, Maddin Corey, Matthew Dutton, Arlyn Ende, Khambrel Green, Petra Fimberger, Ashley Hamilton, Neely Hyde, Jake Kelley, Coyee Shipp Langston, Marie Lauer, Mary B. Lynch, Andrew Merriss, Jane Newman, Renel Plouffe, Gabriel Regagnon, Toneeke Runinwater, Brent Sanders, Thomas Show, Catherine Stetson, John Stone, and Daniel Swanger. 

The Association for Visual Arts is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization that works to connect the visual arts and the community-at-large. They do this by providing resources for those who make art (whether professional artists, emerging artists, students or non-artists) and fostering connections among art-makers and audiences. AVA has a membership of 500, is run by a staff of seven employees and a Board of Directors, and receives support from numerous businesses and public agencies, as well as more than 150 volunteers. They host three different member shows each year, and other programs include annual exhibitions in the Main Gallery and the Landis Student Gallery, a Community Arts program that partners AVA with other nonprofit organizations in the Chattanooga area, the Summer Art Camp & Film Institute, Reel Stories Documentary Program, the Digital Media Lab/Clean Room Photo Studio, and the nationally ranked 4 Bridges Arts Festival. Membership is $45 for an individual for one year. For more information on AVA, visit http://www.avarts.org.

The exhibition will be on display at the Emporium Center, 100 S. Gay St., from June 7-28.  An opening reception will take place as part of First Friday activities on June 7 from 5-9 p.m. Gallery hours are Monday-Friday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. with additional hours on Saturday, June 8, from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.  For more information, contact the Arts & Culture Alliance at 865.523-7543 or visit www.knoxalliance.com.

Also on display in the Emporium during the same time frame:
"Love & Peace: Expressions of the Bible" by Regina Turner
Quilts by Kit Hoefer
Functional and sculptural works in clay by Gray Bearden
Selections from "Presence" by Kelly Hider

“Zarathustra” (Charbonnel ink on Arches paper) by Gabriel Regagnon
“Zarathustra” (Charbonnel ink on Arches paper) by Gabriel Regagnon

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