TDEC’s Office Of Energy Programs Recognizes Tennessee Students At Annual Energy Education Awards

Wednesday, May 08, 2013

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation’s Office of Energy Programs held its annual Energy Education Awards today at the Adventure Science Center in Nashville.  More than 100 students, teachers, parents and 4-H professionals from across the state attended the event, recognizing winners in the Tennessee Youth Awards for Energy Achievement competition. Three schools receiving national honors through the National Energy Education Development Project (NEED) also were announced. 

“The Tennessee Youth Awards for Energy Achievement are designed to recognize students and teachers who conducted projects to educate their peers and communities about energy efficiency and conservation,” said Environment and Conservation Commissioner Bob Martineau.  “The efforts these students and teachers have put forth are helping educate their communities on the importance of energy conservation, and ensuring future generations share in their commitment for a cleaner energy future.” 

At Monday's awards ceremony, state winners received plaques for their schools or projects, which are also judged at the national level.  Photos and cutlines of today’s award winners will be posted in the coming days at www.flickr.com/photos/tnenvironment/ and a reminder will be shared when they are available.   

Schools or programs receiving state recognition in the Tennessee Youth Awards for Energy Achievement included:

  • Primary School of the Year - Lipscomb Academy Elementary School, Nashville
  • Honorable Mention Primary School - West Elementary School, McMinnville
  • Elementary School of the Year - West Carroll Elementary School, Trezevant
  • Second Place Elementary School Winner - Michie Elementary School, Michie
  • Third Place Elementary School Winner - Robert E. Lee Elementary School, Tullahoma
  • Honorable Mention Elementary School - Mary V. Wheeler Elementary, Pikeville
  • Junior Project of the Year - Washington County 4-H, Jonesborough
  • Honorable Mention Junior Project - Meadowview Middle School, Morristown
  • Senior School of the Year - Franklin County High School, Winchester
  • Honorable Mention Senior School - Tyner High Academy, Chattanooga
  • Special Category Winner - Unicoi County 4-H
  • Second Place Special Category - Madison County 4-H
  • Honorable Mention Special Category - Carroll County 4-H

Receiving the highest national honors were Lipscomb Academy Elementary School and Franklin County High School as Primary School of the Year and Secondary School of the Year, respectively.  Unicoi County’s 4-H Program was named a national finalist in the Special Projects category. 

Tennessee schools will be recognized at the NEED Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C. on June 21-24.  In addition to the national honorees, representatives from Lipscomb Academy, West Carroll Elementary School, Washington County 4-H, Franklin County High School and Unicoi County 4-H will attend the national award ceremony. 

In coordination with the department’s 4-H Energy Program, awards were also presented to Unicoi and Washington counties for outstanding energy education programs.  Two 4-H professionals from each county will attend the NEED Energy Educators Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico in July.

Tennessee has received many awards from NEED including the NEED State Program of the Year, NEED Student of the Year and NEED Distinguished Service Awards.  If you would like to learn more about the Office of Energy Programs’ K-12 energy education program, contact Chyrall Dawson at chyrall.dawson@tn.gov or call the Energy Hotline at 800 342-1340.


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