New Wildlife License Plates Available In Georgia

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Three new wild license plate designs are available in local tag offices, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division announced today. And thanks to a new license plate process, the new, rich-colored images cover the entire plate – making an even bolder statement for supporting wildlife conservation.  Georgians have cast their votes for the next generation of wildlife plates and the winning designs include the soaring bald eagle; the bobwhite quail, deer and wild turkey and the brook trout rising to a fly.

All three plates help support important conservation work being done by the Wildlife Resources Division.  Wildlife plates may be purchased for a fee of $60 ($25 manufacturing fee and a $35 plate fee) plus the normal $20 annual registration fee and ad valorem tax - if required. Annual renewal is available for a fee of $35 plus the normal $20 registration fee and ad valorem tax - if required. Vehicle owners who have any of the previous wildlife tags can retain and renew their tag at the specialty tag fee of $35 plus the $20 normal tag fee and ad valorem tax - if required. 

“We are pleased to announce the availability of these beautiful new designs for wildlife license plates,” said Dan Forster, director of the Wildlife Resources Division.  “Our hope is that these plates will be extremely popular because their proceeds fund critical conservation work in Georgia.”

Designs were solicited from artists from around the country and then were placed on the Internet for a public vote.  The three new designs were selected by more than 18,000 people who participated in the voting process. 

The soaring eagle tag replaces the eagle with the flag and hummingbird wildlife license plates, which will no longer be for sale.  The design was developed by Cobb County graphic artist Omar Murcia formerly of THP Graphics Group, Inc. in Conyers.  This license plate supports the Wildlife Resources Division’s Nongame Conservation Section, which uses proceeds from plate purchases and renewals to fund programs focused on conserving Georgia’s nongame and endangered wildlife, rare plants and natural habitats, from bald eagles to pitcherplant bogs.  No state funds are provided for nongame wildlife conservation, education and recreation. These important projects are funded solely through federal grants, direct donations and fundraising initiatives, such as the nongame license plates. 

The quail, white-tailed deer and wild turkey design replaces the state’s second wildlife license plate, which featured a deer and quail taking flight over a field.  This design is original artwork from famed wildlife artist Joe Thornbrugh of Red Crow Studio-Gallery in Victor, Mt.  This tag supports conservation practices in the Bobwhite Quail Initiative, Georgia’s first and only state-funded incentive program for wildlife habitat conservation on private land. Georgia continues to lose natural habitat for quail, songbirds and other wildlife in part because of the state’s fast-growing population, and changing land management practices. 

The trout chasing a fly replaces the Trout Unlimited logo design and benefits the DNR’s trout restoration work.  This original artwork of a native brook trout chasing a fly was designed by Broderick Crawford of Crawford Art Gallery in Clayton.  This design benefits conserving, protecting, and restoring of Georgia’s trout fisheries.

For more information on Georgia’s wildlife license plates and the important projects they support, go to www.georgiawildlife.com.


Appalachian Trail Produces Deer Poacher And Lost Dog

TWRA wildlife officers working along the Appalachian Trail in the Cherokee National Forest near Butler charged a hunter with violations related to illegal deer hunting, then rescued a lost family pet in the same area.  Carter County Wildlife Officer Dennis Ward has documented illegal ATV tracks on Iron Mountain for several years, and while scouting out the area this year, ... (click for more)

Drought-Induced Peril Prompts Rescue Of Endangered Fish

The fishes that live in headwater streams are like the scrappy underdogs of the aquatic world. They’ve adapted to hang tough in low-oxygen conditions and to make it through the occasional drought. But even Rocky Balboa couldn’t go 15 rounds — let alone months at a stretch — without the occasional water break. Thanks to a drought of historic proportions, the few creeks ... (click for more)

Lawsuit Says Girl Received Severe Traumatic Brain Injury In Woodmore Bus Wreck

A new lawsuit in the tragic Woodmore Elementary School bus wreck said one girl on the bus suffered a severe traumatic brain injury. Attorneys Joseph Fried and Michael Goldberg of Fried Rogers Goldberg LLC filed a lawsuit in Hamilton County Circuit Court on behalf of the minor daughter of Shanquatta Byrd. The bus driver, Johnthony Walker, was transporting 37 students from ... (click for more)

Officer Who Was Shot Returned Fire; Is Recovering Well; Shooter Still On Loose

Chattanooga Police Chief Fred Fletcher said Monday morning that the officer who was shot three times on Thursday is recovering well.   Chief Fletcher said the officer was wearing a bullet-proof vest and one bullet hit the vest, which protected him during the shooting.  The officer was able to return fire, although Chief Fletcher would not comment on how many bullets ... (click for more)

Signal Mountain Couldn't Manage Public Education

I have been reading the buzz about Signal Mountain and other small municipalities considering a move to form their own school district within their municipal boundaries.  It is quite the comedy hour considering the notion that small cities that for decades could not even manage small sewer systems or 911 districts, are somehow going to do a better job with public education ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Abolish Bail For Poor

Our terribly overcrowded Hamilton County Jail may get some help from an unsuspected corner – the Obama administration is tackling the fact that right now over 450,000 people are in our country’s jails because they are too poor to pay for bail. It is a violation of the Constitution to “punish people for their poverty.” As the Eighth Amendment provides, “… excessive bail ought not ... (click for more)