Chickens? Maybe. Roosters? Absolutely Not - And Response (2)

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

The City Council has set guidelines and licensing fees for keeping chicken on private property in residential areas. Up to eight chickens. 

There are good points and bad points, as in every issue. Keeping chickens allows owners to harvest totally organic eggs. This is a good thing. However, harvesting organic chicken requires a rooster to regenerate the chicken stock (sorry...had to). A rooster is a completely different matter.

Having lived next to neighbors with chickens I can honest say that chickens do not present an infraction to the noise ordinance. But roosters will...consistently, continually and obnoxiously.

It is the rare rooster who crows only occasionally. Most roosters crow whenever they feel like it, or on cloudy days when the sun is shrouded and the rooster is confused. Roosters are definitely loud. Louder than a car horn. Louder than your screaming neighbor when the power goes off and no one can watch Oprah.

David Fihn, Sr.

* * *

Roosters are not allowed under the proposed ordinance, only hens.  

Lynn Ashton 

* * *

This whole chicken thing needs to be rethought.  What problem does the proposal to allow homeowners to keep chickens inside the city solve?  Is there a shortage of chickens? A lack of eggs?   

The ordinance as drawn up will allow trendy affluent families to have a few chickens because it's so cool to have a few "organic" eggs.  The rest of us, we can't afford the fees.  And anybody who grows a few tomatoes in their backyard knows that to get the best results, those "homegrown" tomatoes end up costing more than those bought from a farmer's market.  Properly kept, those cute chickens will cost, too. 

And chickens properly kept according to the ordinance may turn out to be the exception rather than the rule.  Who will pay to monitor the program to allow your neighbors to keep chickens?  And who will audit the agencies who are responsible for policing the new ordinance?  Fees alone won't do it.  A complaint-driven enforcement system?  That's a laugher.  Plus it's likely to set neighbor against neighbor. Anybody who has had a neighbor with an obstreperous dog knows how difficult it is to even get the city to inspect let alone take any action. 

Properly kept, chicken yards require frequent cleaning. The birds can come down with various bird-illnesses.  Will the city require periodic inspection by a qualified veterinarian?  I think not. The ordinance prohibits slaughtering of chickens outdoors. Indoors?  Perhaps in one's kitchen? And the supposed benefit of obtaining "organic eggs" is suspect, too.  The necessary spraying for insects and disease, and the use of processed chicken feed will put an end to any "organic label." 

The proposed chicken ordinance will not solve any problem, will yield only marginal benefits to a few, will cause neighborhood strife, and will end up costing the taxpayers. 

Everett Kidder




Oh, Woe, What's Next?

Oh woe, what is next is an apt introduction to a topic that lots of people talk about but little actually gets done and the product improves. The product, children, is a blessed event most of the time unless you are black, brown or not readily acceptable to the majority. I saw the prejudice in my small town as Polish, Italian, Latvian immigrants moved to work in the factories ... (click for more)

Bothersome Robo Calls

I receive several (three or more) scammer calls, insurance offers, credit card monitoring services, security services, unknown callers, etc., every day. They come in mostly on my home number but those coming to my cell number seem to be increasing.  Those are mostly unknown callers, no number so you can't block them.  Googling the numbers sometimes confirms they are ... (click for more)

Red Bank Finalizes 20-Cent Property Tax Increase

The Red Bank commissioners voted Tuesday night to adopt the fiscal year 2018-2019 budget that includes a property tax increase. Mayor John Roberts said that along with the increase in both commercial and residential development, comes increased traffic. Infrastructure has not kept up with the growth, including the secondary roads. The cost of paving these roads is $1 million. Money ... (click for more)

Attorney Poston Says Man In Viral Video Seen Fighting Officer Was Trying To Break Up Fight

Attorney McCracken Poston said William Alexander Floyd, the young man seen in the recently published “viral” video who is seemingly engaged in a boxing match with a Chattanooga police officer, started out trying to break up a fight.   The attorney said, "Things are not always as they appear. There is a much more interesting story in the seconds leading up to the events ... (click for more)

Voice Of The Vols John Ward Dies

John Ward, the former “Voice of the Vols,” has died. Senator Lamar Alexander said, “When it came to UT sports, listening to John Ward was almost as good as watching the game. In fact, many Vol fans at many games brought their radios to make sure they could do both. John was a generous, courteous, enthusiastic ambassador for the University of Tennessee. He brought joy ... (click for more)

Belmont University's Mark Price Named Baylor School's Boys' Basketball Coach

Baylor School has named Belmont University's Mark Price as the boys' varsity basketball coach, following veteran basketball coach Austin Clark's announcement in April that he would be retiring after 36 years of coaching the Red Raiders. "I am very excited that Mark will be leading our boys' basketball program.  Throughout this process, we interviewed many individuals who ... (click for more)