Legacy Book Series "Tennessee in the Civil War Volumes 1-6" Now Available

Thursday, June 27, 2013

The Civil War marked every county in Tennessee, battles raged from Bluff City to the bluffs of Memphis and occupying armies enforced martial law on local citizens.

The Tennessee Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission partnered with the Tennessee Historical Society with support from the Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area to produce a legacy book series, Tennessee in the Civil War. Volumes 1-6 have been released, with a total of twelve slated to be released through 2015. Volumes in the series examine the great battles, controversial leaders, first-hand accounts, occupation, experiences on the homefront, women's roles, the triumph of African Americans, and the legacy of the Civil War.

Since 1942, the Tennessee Historical Society has published almost 400 articles on the Civil War in the Volunteer State in its journal, the Tennessee Historical Quarterly. The best of these are being gathered in special volumes through 2015. Each trade-quality, soft cover book is approximately 225 pages, printed on acid-free paper, and includes illustrations, maps, and an index.

 “The Civil War was a total war in Tennessee, touching every man, woman, and child and the places they lived,” said Ann Toplovich, executive director, Tennessee Historical Society. “This book series tells the stories of the people who fought for new freedoms – whether emancipation or state’s rights, of the people who suffered on the homefront from army occupation, of the new visions that were created by the outcome of the war. The best articles by the best Civil War writers are collected in Tennessee in the Civil War.”

 The series editor is Dr. Carroll Van West, director of MTSU Center for Historic Preservation and Tennessee Civil War National Heritage Area and co-chair of the Tennessee Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission.

 Volumes 1-6 of Tennessee in the Civil War: The Best of the Tennessee Historical Quarterly

 Tennessee in the Civil War, Volume 1, provides an overview of the Civil War in the Volunteer State, from its causes to its consequences.

  • The Civil War in Appalachia, Volume 2, focuses on the war in East Tennessee.
  • The Battle of Shiloh, Volume 3, examines that battle, from eye-witness accounts to preservation.
  • The Battle of Stones River and the Fight for Middle Tennessee, Volume 4, studies one of the bloodiest battles of the war, as well as the Battle of Thompson’s Station, the Tullahoma Campaign, and more.
  • Nathan Bedford Forrest and the Confederate Cavalry in West Tennessee, Volume 5, looks at West Tennessee battles and profiles key officers such as Hylan Lyon, “Red” Jackson, and Frank Armstrong.
  • Emancipation and the Fight for Freedom: Tennessee African Americans, 1860-1900, Volume 6, explores the ways African Americans seized new freedom, defying oppression and establishing schools as a path for advancement.

Tennessee in the Civil War volumes 1-6 can be ordered online at http://www.tennesseehistory.org/publications.htm, by calling the Tennessee Historical Society at 615-741 -8934 or emailing. info@tennesseehistory.org.

The Tennessee Sesquicentennial Commission also sponsors a series of major signature events. Presenters will discuss the battles, events, and stories of the Civil War, as well as offer brief dramas and musical entertainment during the free event, Oct. 9-12, 2013 in Chattanooga, Tenn. and Nov. 13-14, 2014 in Franklin, Tenn. For more information, visit www.tncivlwar150.com.


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