TDOT Announces Aeronautics Grants For 6 Tennessee Airports

Thursday, July 11, 2013

The Tennessee Department of Transportation announced Thursday that federal and state aeronautics grants totaling $175,215 have been approved for six Tennessee airports.

Airports receiving grants include: 

Athens (McMinn County) – McMinn County Airport
Lebanon (Wilson County) – Lebanon Municipal Airport
Collegedale (Hamilton County) – Collegedale Municipal Airport
Morristown (Hamblen County) – Moore-Murrell Field
Fayetteville (Lincoln County) – Fayetteville Municipal Airport
Sevierville (Sevier County) – Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge Airport
 
For more details on each of these grants visit:  
http://www.tn.gov/tdot/news/2013/GrantDetails07-10-13.pdf
 

The grants are made available through the Tennessee Department of Transportation’s Aeronautics Division. 

The Division administers federal and state funding to assist in the location, design, construction and maintenance of Tennessee's diverse public aviation system. 

Except for routine expenditures, grant applications are reviewed by the Tennessee Aeronautics Commission, which is a five member board charged with policy planning and with regulating changes in the state Airport System Plan. The board reviews all applications for grants to ensure that the proper state and local matching funds are in place and that the grants will be used for needed improvements.

The TDOT Aeronautics Division has the responsibility of inspecting and licensing the state’s 142 heliports and 79 public/general aviation airports.  The Division also provides aircraft and related services for state government and staffing for the Tennessee Aeronautics Commission.

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