Red Clay State Park Commemorates 175th Anniversary of the Trail of Tears

Event Will Be Held August 3-4, Featuring Cherokee Traditions

Wednesday, July 17, 2013
 Red Clay State Park will host “Honor and Remember” August 3-4, an event to commemorate the 175th anniversary of the Trail of Tears. 

The anniversary event will be held Saturday, August 3 and Sunday, August 4 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. Re-enactors will demonstrate 18th and early 19th century southeastern life, featuring Cherokee and non-native settlers, sutlers and blanket traders. The 175th anniversary event will also include Cherokee foods, music, dancing, storytelling and demonstrations of traditional crafts and skills.

Park rangers will lead hikes and speakers will give lectures discussing various topics related to the Cherokee and the Trail of Tears. A Birds of Prey program will also be offered each day. While the event is free and open to the public, there is a $5 donation fee per vehicle.

“Red Clay’s commemoration of the 175th anniversary of the Trail of Tears is a great opportunity for visitors to view a depiction of Cherokee life in the 1700’s and early 1800’s,” Park Manager Erin Medley said. 

 In addition to the August anniversary event, a Cherokee Summer Concert Series is being held each Saturday night in July, leading up to the event. A Cherokee musician will perform each Saturday night from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the park’s large amphitheater. Light refreshments will be served and there is a $3 entrance fee per person.

 For more information on the anniversary event or the concert series, please call Red Clay’s park office at (423) 478-0339 or visit www.tnstateparks.com/RedClay.

 Red Clay State Historic Park is located in the extreme southwest corner of Bradley County, just above the Tennessee-Georgia state line, and is the site of 11 of the last 12 Cherokee Council meetings before the infamous Trail of Tears.  The park encompasses 263 acres of narrow valley and forested ridges and features picnic facilities, a loop trail and amphitheater.  The park also contains a natural landmark, the Blue Hole Spring, which arises from beneath a limestone ledge to form a deep pool that flows into Mill Creek.  The Cherokee used the Blue Hole Spring as their water supply during council meetings.  For more information about the park, please visit www.tnstateparks.com/RedClay/.

 Tennessee's 54 state parks and 82 state natural areas offer diverse natural, recreational and cultural experiences for individuals, families or business and professional groups.  State park features range from pristine natural areas to 18-hole championship golf courses.  For a free brochure about Tennessee State Parks, call toll free at 1-888-867-2757. For upcoming events at Tennessee State Parks, please visit the state parks website at www.tnstateparks.com.

 


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