Bradley County Schools Meet 9 Of 11 Achievement Targets On 2013 Tests

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

In the 2012-2013 school year, Bradley County students met 9 out of the 11achievement targets for grades 3-12 that were established by the Tennessee Department of Education, officials said Wednesday.  

The system reached or exceeded Achievement Goals in grades 3-8 math, third grade reading, third grade math, seventh grade reading, English III, Algebra I, Algebra II, seventh grade math, and Graduation Rate. "We are extremely proud of our Graduation Rate of 93.9%," stated Angie Gill, System Testing Coordinator and Data Analysis. "Our teachers have worked hard, and we will continue to do so as we strive for increased student learning."

Third grade reading scores for Bradley County Schools increased 4.5 percentage points to 56.2% proficient or advanced which is above the state average of 48.8%.  

"The Response to Intervention (RTI) process that has been in place for several years in Bradley County Schools has had a tremendous impact on student achievement by allowing us to identify struggling students early and provide intervention," Director of Schools Johnny Mr. McDaniel said.  

Also, third grade math scores have risen to 63.9% of students being proficient and/or advanced in Bradley County Schools compared to the state average of 59%.

Students in Bradley County Schools also showed major gains in STEM subjects, specifically science and math, officials said.  Algebra I scores increased 7.3 percentage points to 68.5% of students scoring proficient and advanced while Algebra II saw an amazing growth of 17.5 percentage points.  

"This notable achievement  in Algebra," according to Dan Glasscock, Supervisor of Secondary Education, "is a credit to the collaborative effort of our math teachers at both Bradley Central and Walker Valley High Schools.  They focused on the state math standards and really challenged their students to succeed."  

The proficiency rate in grades 3-8 science grew by more than 2.3 percentage points to 64.6%. Math in grades 3-8 increased 3.5 percentage points. Biology increased 5.7 percentage points to 68.2% of our students scoring proficient and advanced.

The Tennessee Department of Education has set measurable accountability goals for each district for improving the educational system and utilizing data to ensure growth for all students.  Through First to the Top and the Department of Education's accountability system, Tennessee is striving to raise student achievement levels and reduce achievement gaps among particular subgroups.  The department is preparing to release district achievement scores this week as a reflection of how schools and districts are doing at meeting these ambitious goals. 

Officials said the vision for Bradley County Schools "is to be a welcoming center of educational excellence committed to total student development utilizing data-driven, research-based strategies."

"We believe that all children can learn, and our mission is to prepare students to be college and career ready upon graduation," stated Mr. McDaniel. 

He said, "During the 2012-2013 school year, Bradley County Schools paid extremely close attention to meeting the needs of students with disabilities (SWD). This was one of two subgroups previously identified by the Tennessee Department of Education as needing focused attention.  Bradley County Schools improved achievement scores with this population of students to help close the gap between SWD and Non-SWD."

 "We are very proud of our students and teachers for their efforts and hard work which resulted in improved achievement scores," stated Ruth Ann White, Director of Special Services. "We recognize that our scores indicate a need for continued improvement, and we are focused on higher achievement and academic growth for all students."

The Economically Disadvantaged (ED) subgroup in Bradley County Schools improved in all accountability areas for achievement. "One of our brightest spots in achievement was in Algebra II where ED students increased 17.7 percentage points," remarked Director McDaniel.   ED students in Algebra I also showed an increase in proficiency levels by 8.8 percentage points.

Five schools were identified as Focus Schools last year. These schools focused on closing the gap between ED students and non-ED students. During the year, faculty and staff received training on how to work with children of poverty.  "Best practice strategies were shared with all schools in the district to impact the whole district and not just a few schools," stated Terri Murray, Federal Projects Director.

District-level TVAAS Composites are scores that assess growth at the district level. These scores are comprised of SAT 10 (grades K-2), TCAP (grades 3-8), and EOC (grades 9-12) testing results. One-year, two-year, and three-year trends are reported for each district-level composite: Overall, Literacy, Numeracy, and Literacy and Numeracy. 

 "I am very pleased to report that we have scores of level 5 in all areas of our District-Level Composite," stated Mr. McDaniel. "A score of '5' is the most effective where students are making substantially more progress than the Standard for Academic Growth."

He said that "even with these significant gains, the Bradley County School District, under the new accountability system, will most likely be found to be a system 'In Need of Subgroup Improvement.'  Though the system has successfully reached achievement goals for 2012-2013, continued areas of focus will be on closing the achievement gaps among particular subgroups, such as Economically Disadvantaged, Students with Disabilities, Limited English Proficient, and Black and Hispanic students, as well as increasing student achievement for all students.  

 "We believe that all children can learn, and our mission is to prepare students to be college and career ready."


Cleveland Senior Awarded Wacker Science Scholarship

A $1000 Wacker Science Award scholarship was presented last night to Suzanna Liner, a graduating senior at Cleveland High School.    “We were pleased to honor Suzanna with this award to recognize her academic excellence and accomplishments,” said Konrad Bachhuber, vice president and site manager at Wacker Polysilicon North America. “She was an excellent match ... (click for more)

Georgia Northwestern Holds Spring Commencement Ceremony

Georgia Northwestern Technical College (GNTC) students donned their caps and gowns as family and friends gathered at the Forum in Rome to watch them walk across the stage and turn their tassels at GNTC’s Spring Commencement Ceremony on Thursday, May 5.   The college awarded graduates with associate degrees, diplomas, and certificates during the ceremony, which honored ... (click for more)

Fire Displaces Mother And Son At House Near Dodds Avenue

No one was home when fire broke out in a Chattanooga home near Dodds Avenue late Friday morning. The Chattanooga Fire Department received the alarm around 11 a.m. and responded to 2609 Reece St. with four fire companies.  Battalion Chief Carlos Hampton said the firefighters made a quick, interior attack and got the fire under control in roughly 10 minutes. ... (click for more)

Planning Commission To Review New Form-Based Code Monday At 1 PM; Start Zoning Cases At 3 PM

The Planning Commission on Monday afternoon will be reviewing the proposed Form Based Code in addition to a large number of zoning cases.   Officials said the new code and the zoning cases "have generated significant public interest so we are expecting a large crowd."  The review of the Form-Based Code by the Planning Commission is scheduled to take ... (click for more)

The History Of Avondale Recreation Center

I grew up in Avondale from third grade until I was married and two children. East Chattanooga had a center since before I was born. The only time I was gone was when I, along with six buddies, joined the USMC.   The families in Avondale, a working class neighborhood, wanted a community center closer to home so the Avondale Civic League took on the task. They raised the money ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Bad Ideas Never Work

When the Chattanooga City Council gave Kevin Muhammad, who is purportedly the “leader” of the Nation of Islam’s “Chattanooga chapter” or whatever it is, “the right” to speak for 20 anguished minutes on Monday night, everybody who heard about it could have told our city leaders it was “stinkin’ thinkin’.” My goodness, did you think he was going to read a sweet passage from the ... (click for more)