Documentary Produced on Tennessee State Capitol

Wednesday, July 03, 2013
Tennessee State Capitol Building in Nashville
Tennessee State Capitol Building in Nashville

It has endured an army occupation, the interment of two of its founding fathers, and a car cruising through its hallways. Not to mention its role as the site of many of the most important events in Tennessee's history. The Tennessee State Capitol building has many great stories to tell - and some of those stories were revealed in a documentary about the building that premiered last week. In attendance were state legislators, department commissioners, representatives from preservation groups and others.

The documentary was created by the staff of the Tennessee State Library and Archives. It is the first part of a project that will eventually include a virtual tour of the Capitol building and its grounds, and feature stories about the building and influential people in Tennessee history.

When completed, the entire project will be burned onto DVDs that will be distributed to schools throughout the state.

The project is a result of the Tennessee General Assembly's approval of Public Chapter No. 557, sponsored by Representative Jim Coley and Senator Ken Yager.

"I appreciate the support of the Tennessee General Assembly in the passage of Public Chapter No. 557, which has led us to the creation of a comprehensive digital record of the Tennessee State Capitol's history," Secretary of State Tre Hargett said. "That history will be available to people now and in the future - 24 hours a day, seven days a week and free of charge - over the Internet. There are many things about the Capitol's history that will surprise people. This building doesn't have its own Trivial Pursuit game, but it could."

"The mission of the State Library and Archives is to preserve Tennessee's history for everyone," State Librarian and Archivist Chuck Sherrill said. "This video draws on some of the vast treasures contained in our archives to tell the story of the Capitol building."

The original cornerstone of the Capitol building was laid on July 4, 1845. In the 14 years that followed, architect William Strickland - with assistance from Samuel Morgan, Francis Strickland and Harvey Ackroyd - designed and oversaw the building that is still in use today. Although the Capitol has gone through various renovations over nearly 170 years, many of the building's original characteristics are unchanged. This historical national landmark is one of the nation's oldest working statehouses still in use.

The documentary and information on the images used in the film are available at www.capitol.tnsos.net. Additionally, the virtual tour, mini-features, and fun stories about the Tennessee State Capitol will be available soon.


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