Tennessee Environmental Council Opens Chattanooga Office

Monday, August 12, 2013
Tina Harvey Crawford
Tina Harvey Crawford

The Tennessee Environmental Council will officially announce the opening of its Southeast Tennessee Region satellite office in Chattanooga at a Green Drinks Event.  Tina Harvey Crawford has joined the Council as Southeast Regional director where she will help implement the Council’s programming, fundraising and development. 

Tennessee Environmental Council educates and advocates for the conservation and improvement of Tennessee’s Environment, communities and public health.  

The event will take place Wednesday, Aug. 28, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.

m. at The Crash Pad, the only certified LEED platinum certified hostel.  It is located at 29 Johnson St.

The event is free with registration at www.tectn.org .

“We want to be the ‘little engine that could’ for this part of the state and bring better focus to local environmental needs and solutions,“ Ms. Harvey Crawford said. 

The first project has begun with establishment of a summer youth program in partnership with the Alton Park Development Corporation.  At risk youth have been able to plant trees, clean up litter, and get hands-on experiences in local creeks to understand the importance of watershed health. 

“We are delighted to have Tina on board to expand our reach so vital for future sustainability,” John McFadden, Tennessee Environmental Council’s Executive Director said.   “Over 1,000 trees have already been planted in the Chattanooga region as a part of our Tennessee Tree Project and, since water quality is a local issue, we will be looking for natural watershed restoration projects we can implement.”

Tennessee Environmental Council is a non-profit membership organization that has been educating and advocating for the conservation and improvement of Tennessee's environment, communities, and public health since 1970.  The annual Sustainable Tennessee Summit will be held this year in Chattanooga at UTC. 

Tennessee River Rescue Scheduled For Saturday

The Tennessee River Rescue is  scheduled for Saturday, from  9 a.m.-1 p.m. More information can be found at  https://www.facebook.com/ TennesseeRiverRescue (click for more)

Claire Henley: Adventures West (The House Of Chris)

(Editor's Note: Chattanoogan Claire Henley started an adventure of a lifetime on the remote Pacific Crest Trail in April. Along the way, she had many adventures and found herself a husband named Big Spoon). Back in Quincy, Big Spoon and I didn’t have anywhere in particular to go, and so we wandered around. The Quincy Museum next to the courthouse caught Big Spoon’s eye, as did ... (click for more)

Bullets Ring Out Near Alton Park School Bus Stop Sending Students Scrambling

Bullets rang out near an Alton Park school bus stop on Tuesday morning, sending students scrambling for cover. Police took one suspect into custody and were looking for a second person said to be involved. The incident happened on W. 38th Street across from the Bethlehem Center and was believed to be gang related. Crime tape quickly went up at the shooting scene, and W. ... (click for more)

Woman, 20, Forced Into Man's Truck, Raped

A woman, 20, was kidnapped and sexually assaulted on Monday.    At approximately 5 p.m. Chattanooga Police responded to the report of a sexual assault. The victim told police she had been walking on the 3200 block of Calhoun Street when she was approached by a white male in a newer model black Ford truck. The suspect made several lewd comments toward the victim ... (click for more)

Ole Man River Just Keeps Rollin

Citizens are hearing yet another new chapter in Chattanooga’s 21st Century Riverfront concrete repair saga. It seems it will require more repair, more delays and more tax dollars to do it. When will it end? Construction of the Riverfront concrete structures began in 2003. Before it was finished, designers, engineers, contractors, Public Works officials, Mayor Littlefield and ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: It Was Our Tool Shed

Some said the huge beams had been soaking in creosote for two or three years when the men finally stacked them to dry. They were long, about 20 feet each, and thick – maybe eight inches. I remember they were 14 inches wide but the biggest thing I remember was that it was the ugliest lumber I ever saw. They cured the beams for one entire hot summer in the Tool Shed, a huge building ... (click for more)