Psychology Degree Approved For Dalton State

Thursday, August 15, 2013

The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia approved Dalton State College’s application to offer a Bachelor of Science degree in psychology, bringing to 17 the number of four-year degrees offered by the College.  The new program became effective August 14.

According to Dr. Sandra Stone, Vice President for Academic Affairs, “This new degree is consistent with the College’s mission to meet the workforce needs of the Northwest Georgia area, as it will provide local employers with college graduates who are well versed in the basics of human cognitive and emotional processes and individual and social behavior, in addition to having a solid grounding in research, analytic, observational, learning, memory, and writing skills.

“The program was designed to prepare students seeking employment in careers that require competence in critical thinking, communication, research, and interpretive skills, as well as to prepare students for further graduate study should they decide to pursue advanced degrees,” she said.

“A bachelor’s degree in psychology can provide the appropriate foundation for a large number of jobs in business, mental health and social services, and other career areas,” Stone said, citing positions such as customer service representative, sales associate, loan officer, management trainee, marketing representative, child protective services worker, employment counselor, residential youth counselor, affirmative action officer, statistical assistant, patient care representative, congressional aide, animal behaviorist, and others.

“According to a recent article published by the American Psychological Association, ‘…experts say it’s never been a better time to be a psychologist, thanks largely to the psychology field’s breadth and adaptability,’” she said.

“The feasibility study completed for the program proposal indicated that this was a program in high demand by current and prospective students as well as local employers, and we are very pleased to be able to offer this bachelor’s degree in psychology to the Northwest Georgia community,” Stone continued.

According to Dr. Jodi Johnson, Vice President for Enrollment and Student Services, approximately 130 Dalton State students are currently enrolled in the school’s associate degree program in psychology and would be eligible to enter the bachelor’s degree program rather than transfer to another college or university.

Other bachelor’s degree programs offered by Dalton State are the bachelor of business administration in accounting, bachelor of science in biology, BS in chemistry, BS in criminal justice, BS in early childhood education, bachelor of arts in English, BA in history, BA in interdisciplinary studies, BBA in management, BBA in management information systems, BBA in marketing, BS in mathematics, BS in nursing, BS in organizational leadership (online degree program), bachelor of social work, and bachelor of applied science in technology management. Dalton State’s degrees in biology, chemistry, English, history, and mathematics also come with a secondary certification option allowing the graduate to teach in the content area at the secondary school level.

“We are approaching the tipping point where we will offer more four-year degree programs than two-year degree programs,” said Dalton State President Dr. John O. Schwenn of the 17 to 21 ratio. “This is significant as we evolve into the premiere four year institution we aspire to be.”


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