Military Move To More Lead-Free Ammunition Could Save Millions Of Birds

Monday, August 19, 2013

The decision by the United States military to move to a non-lead version of their 7.62 mm bullet could prompt voluntary changes in hunting practices, potentially saving millions of birds in the United States from ingestion of spent lead ammunition, says George Fenwick, president of American Bird Conservancy, one of the country’s leading bird conservation organizations.

“If non-lead ammunition is good enough for the U.S. military, with all their ballistics and performance testing, it should be good enough for hunters,” said Mr.

Fenwick.

ABC is encouraging the hunting community to voluntarily switch from traditional lead-based ammunition in favor of non-lead alternatives based on hundreds of peer-reviewed studies showing that millions of birds are poisoned every year following ingestion of either shotgun pellets mistaken for grit or seeds or lead particles left in gut piles following hunts. Among the birds most impacted are: Bald Eagles, hawks, vultures, California Condors, and Mourning Doves.
 
Mr. Fenwick added that the military’s voluntary conversion to non-lead ammunition may eventually blunt the most common concern about non-lead ammunition: the cost. “The quantities of ammo required by the military will no doubt require that ammo producers acquire the new equipment to not only produce non-lead ammo, but also produce it in large quantities at much lower costs,” he said. “This is a game-changer because it provides a signal to the ammunition manufacturing industry that the non-lead market is increasing, and provides some assurances that necessary capital investments will be safe financial risks,” he said.
 
The switch to non-lead 7.62 mm bullets follows another military ammunition switch in 2010, which converted the 5.56 mm to a non-lead bullet. The switch to the 5.56 mm non-lead bullet eliminated nearly 2,000 tons of lead from the environment. Future projections of the new non-lead round estimate that its use could result in an additional 4,000 tons of lead being eliminated from ammunition production. The military’s new 7.62 mm non-lead ammunition is expected to be used starting in 2014. 

“Painting The Nature Of The Cumberland River” Is Subject For June Nature @ Noontime Program

Larry Richardson, a veteran environmental conservationist, will present a program on the history and impact of the Cumberland River at the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s June Nature @ Noontime. The program will be held on Thursday, June 4, from noon-1 p.m. at the TWRA’s Region II Ray Bell Building located in the Ellington Agriculture Complex. Mr. Richardson’s professional ... (click for more)

Officer Wayne Rich Receives Shikar-Safari Award

Wayne Rich, of the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency, has been honored by the Shikar–Safari Club International as its 2014 Tennessee Wildlife Law Enforcement Officer of the Year. Mr. Rich serves as a wildlife officer in Jefferson County. He was recognized at the May meeting of the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission. The annual award from the conservation-based organization ... (click for more)

Driver Of Fleeing Truck Almost Hits Patrol Vehicle Of Bradley County Sheriff Eric Watson; Gooch Arrested After Wreck

Deputies with the Bradley County Sheriff’s Office took an area man into custody on Friday afternoon after the stolen truck he was driving forced Sheriff Eric Watson to take evasive action to avoid striking the vehicle.   Sheriff Watson was patrolling in the area of Bates Pike when an alert was issued for a light blue F-150 pickup truck for a possible vandalism in progress. ... (click for more)

Man Drove On Pineville Railroad Tracks Trying To Flee Police

Chattanooga Police Officer Giuseppe Troncone didn’t try to follow a 49-year-old man who tried to escape by driving his Cadillac on railroad tracks in the Pineville area, according to an affidavit filed in Hamilton County Criminal Sessions Court. Instead, he soon caught up with Alvin Donell Davis just by driving along East Elmwood Drive toward the “cloud of smoke coming from the ... (click for more)

Best City, Really? - And Response

I believe the success Chattanooga has had in the best outdoor city contest has got to be the "Ridge Cut" trail. To be able to sit in your vehicle while inching along right beside the old steel plant and, of course, the train yard where tankers sit loaded with hazardous gases. Then passing through one of the city's most active areas for gunfire, it's a win win.   It's ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: City Limits Worry Dogs, Cats

If you are a dog or a cat in the Chattanooga area, it is very important to know exactly where the city limits are. You need to know that if a stray animal is rescued in the city, it is taken to one of the finest animal shelters in all of America. But if the errant pooch or tabby is found in Hamilton County – outside the city limits -- it is taken to arguably the worst animal facility ... (click for more)