Dalton State Hosts Seventh Annual Domestic Violence Conference

Monday, August 19, 2013
Members of the Planning Committee for the Seventh Annual Domestic Violence Conference to be held Oct. 25 at Dalton State College are from left, front row: Jim Sneary, Pallavi Manay, Sarah Walker and Wesley Lynch; middle row: Sue Jordan, Suzanne Harbin, and Marcy Muller; back row: Lynne Cabe, Alexis Thompson.
Members of the Planning Committee for the Seventh Annual Domestic Violence Conference to be held Oct. 25 at Dalton State College are from left, front row: Jim Sneary, Pallavi Manay, Sarah Walker and Wesley Lynch; middle row: Sue Jordan, Suzanne Harbin, and Marcy Muller; back row: Lynne Cabe, Alexis Thompson.

Topics ranging from the mental health needs of abuse survivors to abuse in the workplace will be covered in the Seventh Annual Domestic Violence Conference to be hosted Friday, Oct. 25, at Dalton State College.


The annual conference is sponsored this year by the Conasauga Family Violence Alliance and the Dalton State College Department of Social Work, Shaw Industries, Northwest Georgia Family Crisis Center, McGuffey Elder Law Practice, Georgia Commission on Family Violence, NWGA Area Agency on Aging/Georgia Cares, and the Georgia Commission Against Domestic Violence.


Designed to “provide information and training to professionals, community organizations, faith communities, and families in order to increase understanding, dispel myths, and assist attendees in effectively identifying and responding to domestic violence,” according to organizing committee chair Lynne Cabe, the conference attracts helping professionals and others interested in the problem of domestic violence from across the northwest Georgia and southeast Tennessee region.


“The annual domestic violence conference serves the professional and lay communities of the northwest Georgia region by providing education, increasing awareness, and supporting the eventual elimination of domestic violence,” Cabe continues.


Highlights of the day will include a morning keynote address on “Religion and Domestic Violence: Theology and Abuse,” by Dr. David Kitts.


Attendees will have their choice of morning breakout sessions including “Religion and DV: Engaging Faith Communities in Responding to Domestic Violence,” by Dr. Kitts; “Part I: Recognizing and Addressing DV in Divorcing Couples: A Clinical Perspective,” by Leslie Dinkins; and “The DV Investigation: Key to Successful Prosecution or Unwitting Sabotage of the Case,” with Kermit McManus, former District Attorney for the Conasauga Judicial Court.


Lunchtime will include “Gloria’s Story: A Dramatization of a Victim’s Search for Help,” a brief skit, followed by a discussion about how formal and informal roles in the community are vital to ending domestic violence. In addition, there will be a presentation of awards, including the Betty Higgins Domestic Violence Victim Advocate Award and the Jackie Williams Criminal Justice Award.


Lunch will be followed by Dr. Kitts’ plenary address, “Domestic Violence in the Workplace: It’s Your Business,” after which conference attendees will have a choice of second-round breakout sessions, including “Investigating Domestic Violence Strangulation Injuries” with Dr. Kitts; “Part II: Addressing Domestic Violence in Divorcing Couples: A Survivor’s Perspective” with Kelley Linn and Leslie Dinkins, and “Hybrid Trafficking: Exploitation of Adults with Disabilities in Georgia” with Patricia S. King.


Continuing education units are available for licensed social workers, licensed professional counselors, licensed marriage and family therapists, family violence intervention program facilitators, law enforcement officers, and attorneys.


Cost of the daylong conference is $40 (includes lunch) for those who register before Oct. 23; after that date, it will be $50 and will not include lunch. For registration information, go to http://dvconference2013.eventbrite.comThose with questions are invited to call 706/272-2258 ext. 2153.



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