History Center Presents Civil War Medicine Program September 15

Thursday, August 22, 2013

The Chattanooga History Center will present From the Journal of a Confederate Nurse for ages 8 and up at 2:30-4:00pm on Sunday, September 15th, at the Center. The program will be led by CHC History Educator, Caroline Sunderland. The fee is $10 for 1 parent and 1 child ($5 for CHC members). Each child must be accompanied by an adult. Space is limited and pre-registration is required by Thursday, September 12th. Call 423-265-3247 to register.

This program offers a great opportunity for family members to explore history together.

Parents, grandparents, or other relatives or caregivers are invited to accompany their youngsters in taking a then-and-now look at the practice of medicine. They will be guided by an historic interpreter dressed as Civil War nurse Kate Cumming might have been. Using Kate's journal, participants will learn about the importance of research based on primary sources, and the potential importance of journaling. There will be fun activities and an examination of the authentic Civil War field surgeon's kit to be used in the CHC's new exhibit.

In1862, Confederate nurse Kate Cumming served the wounded in the Chattanooga area. As the Union Army moved toward Chattanooga, Kate moved south into Georgia, where she worked at several locations receiving the southern wounded. She continued to move with the front line of battle throughout the war. She recorded in her journal the work performed in the wartime hospitals, including the field tent hospitals. Much of what is known today about Civil War medicine comes to us through Kate's journal.


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