Sewanee Arts Festival To Be Held Sept. 11-21

Friday, August 23, 2013

The University of the South will hold the inaugural Sewanee Arts Festival, Sept. 11-21. (Some exhibits will be open before and after these dates, but most talks and special events are scheduled during the festival period.) Events will include dance performances, photography exhibits, plays and readings, and music—including a concert by the Blind Boys of Alabama. All events, except the Blind Boys of Alabama concert, are free of charge. All times are Central.

            The University Art Gallery opens the 2013–14 exhibition season with Pradip Malde’s The Third Heaven, Photographs from Haiti, 2006-2012, on view from Sept.

3 through Oct. 18. (Artist’s talk Sept. 13.) Free admission.

            Monica Bill Barnes & Company (contemporary American dance) perform at the Tennessee Williams Center at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 11 and 12. Part of the Performing Arts Series; admission is free, reservations are encouraged (e-mail mcook@sewanee.edu).

            An exhibition of 16 photographs by William Eggleston will be on view from Sept. 12 to Dec. 20 in the University Archives and Special Collections. Photos are from the collection of university regent Chris Hehmeyer. Free admission; the exhibition is open 1-5 p.m. weekdays.

            Pradip Malde presents The Third Heaven, Photographs from Haiti, 2006-2012 in an artist’s talk in Convocation Hall at 4:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 13, followed by a light reception. Free admission.

An exhibition of Charley Watkins paintings and photography, with special performances and readings, at IONA Art Sanctuary, Sept. 13, 14 and 15. IONA Art Sanctuary, founded by Sewanee artist Ed Carlos to offer a place for writers and artists to share their creative work with each other and the community, is located at 630 Garnertown Road, Sewanee (off Hwy 56-S from 41-A).

Sept. 13, 7 p.m. – Charley Watkins will show his paintings and photography. Linda Heck will offer music and readings. Kevin Cummings and Kiki Beavers will also read.

Sept. 14, 1-3 p.m. – The Charley Watkins paintings and photography exhibit continues.

Sept. 15, 2-3 p.m. – The Watkins art exhibit concludes with readings by Pat Wiser, David Landon and college students studying theatre with Landon.

            Laura Lapins Willis will read from Finding God in a Bag of Groceries at Rivendell Writers' Colony at 7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 15. Reception will follow. Free admission; please RSVP to 931.598.5555.

            Reading of “Requiem for August Moon,” a new play by Tennessee Williams Playwright Elyzabeth Wilder. Tuesday, Sept. 17, at 5:30 p.m. at the Tennessee Williams Center. (Reading by a cast of university students.) Free admission.

            Poetry reading by Rodney Jones and Maurice Manning at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18, in Gailor Auditorium. Part of the Sewanee Writers' Conference Reading Series. Free admission.

            Third annual Sewanee Angel Festival, 7-11 p.m. Friday, Sept. 20, downtown Sewanee. Music by Towson Engsberg and Friends, and the Stagger Moon Band. Free event.

            Saturday, Sept. 21, an exhibition by Watkins Art Institute students and St. Andrew’s-Sewanee graduates Ian Corvette and Kellen Mayfield will be on view at IONA Art Sanctuary from 1-3 p.m. IONA Art Sanctuary is located at 630 Garnertown Road, Sewanee (off Hwy 56-S from 41-A).

Gallery walk and receptions Saturday, Sept. 21, on the University of the South campus will feature three exhibitions of contemporary photography with a distinct food and drink pairing in each gallery: the Carlos Gallery 4:30 p.m., Archives and Special Collections 5:15 p.m., University Art Gallery 6:15 p.m.

The Performing Arts Series presents the Blind Boys of Alabama, living legends of gospel music whose collaborations have included Bonnie Raitt, Tom Waits, k.d. lang, Lou Reed, Peter Gabriel, and Asleep at the Wheel. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21, in Guerry Auditorium. Tickets are $25/adults, $20/seniors, $10/non-Sewanee students.

Sewanee: The University of the South, familiarly known as Sewanee, comprises a nationally recognized College of Arts and Sciences and a distinguished School of Theology. Located on 13,000 acres in Tennessee’s Cumberland Plateau, Sewanee enrolls 1,500 undergraduates and approximately 100 seminarians. For more information about Sewanee: The University of the South, visit www.sewanee.edu.



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