Civil War Banquet Planned for September 27

Will be Fundraiser for the Historic Fort Wood Neighborhood

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

An outdoor Civil War Banquet will be held in the Fort Wood Historic District on September 27, joining the list of special events commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Battles of Chattanooga. This event will serve as a fundraiser for the Fort Wood Neighborhood Association, a 501(c)3 organization.

The banquet will be hosted under a tent on the lawn at 850 Fort Wood Street, one of the neighborhood’s historic buildings, which now serves as the business headquarters of Jay Robinson Real Estate.

  The banquet will begin at 6:30 PM with appetizers and spirits, followed by a three course plated dinner at 7:15 PM. Music of the period and Civil War re-enactors will add to the ambiance. Following the dinner, Daryl Black, executive director of the Chattanooga History Center, will speak about Fort Wood’s role in the battles of the Civil War in a 20-minute program entitled “After Chickamauga.”

Self-guided historic walking tours of the neighborhood will be offered at no charge, and prints of the original fort in Fort Wood will be offered for purchase.

Attendance for the Civil War Banquet is limited to 150 seats. The ticket price is $75, and may be purchased online at  Sponsors for the banquet are First Tennessee Bank, Cansler Photography, Jay Robinson Real Estate and the Chattanooga History Center.

The original “fort” in Fort Wood was an earthwork stronghold constructed by Union forces in 1863 during their occupation of Chattanooga. Originally named for Colonel William R. Creighton, killed at Ringgold, Georgia, in November 1863, the fort was renamed after 1864 in honor of General Thomas Wood.

On September 19 and 20, 1863, the Union Army of the Cumberland struggled with Confederate forces south of Chattanooga along the banks of Chickamauga Creek. After an epic collapse on September 20, Union troops retreated into Chattanooga demoralized and beaten. Many feared for the army's survival. Within days, however, these men had created a formidable ring of fortifications around Chattanooga. Centered on Fort Wood, these lines of entrenchments provided security to the harried soldiers and allowed them to hold the town that Abraham Lincoln considered among the most strategic points in the nation. A mere two months later, the decisive attack on the Confederate forces on Missionary Ridge began when signal shots rang out from the Union artillery at Fort Wood. The victory gained that day assured the collapse of the Confederacy. 

   For more information about the Civil War Banquet, call 423.265.0771 ext. 100. For more information about the Fort Wood Historic District, visit

Tri-state (TN-GA-AL) Rail Stops Planned but Never Built

NEW ORLEANS, MOBILE, AND CHATTANOOGA RAILROAD, 1871   Th New Orleans, Mobile, and Chattanooga Railroad (NOM&C) was the first to serve the City of New Orleans and the Central Gulf Coast.   Chartered to build a railway linking the three cities in their name, the initial intent was to build to a link from the coast with the planned Alabama and Chattanooga Railroad ... (click for more)

Chester Martin Remembers St. Elmo

I am (highly) qualified to make the brash pronouncement that St. Elmo (Chattanooga's first suburb) is as much a state of mind as it is an actual place. It is a place that gets into your mind and into your blood, and sometimes under your skin - indelibly. I have witnessed the same phenomenon in distant cities, but I do not think it is so strong an emotion there as it is here ... (click for more)

School Board Chooses Charlotte Firm For Superintendent Search Firm; Lennon, Testerman Want To Keep Kelly

The County School Board on Thursday night voted 5-4 to choose a Charlotte, N.C., search firm to pick a new county school superintendent. Coleman Lew and Associates was selected over McPherson & Jacobson of Omaha. That vote came after board members Kathy Lennon and David Testerman started the session by saying they are very pleased with Interim Supt. Kirk Kelly and would ... (click for more)

Judge Finds Young Guilty Of Lesser Charge In Fatal Wreck On Highway 58

Judge Tom Greenholtz on Wednesday found William Henry Young guilty of a lesser charge in a fatal traffic accident on Highway 58. The judge, who heard the case without a jury, ruled the 56-year-old former TVA employee guilty of criminally negligent homicide. He had been charged with vehicular homicide. Sentencing will be in December. Judge Greenholtz dismissed charges ... (click for more)

Accountability Doesn't Have To Be A Bad Word

Am I making a difference? Isn’t that the basic question we all ask ourselves, and seek to demonstrate to others?  Ronald Reagan said:  “Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. But, the Marines don't have that problem.”   We would argue teachers do not have that problem either.    Educators make a huge difference ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Guess Who Backed Kelly?

Two weeks before the August election where three members of the Hamilton County School Board were angrily replaced, the organizer of what was called “a great way for the (challengers) to raise great money to help them run smart campaigns” made a bold statement. “I'm sure the current board is well-intentioned, but the results are not there," said Paul Brock. "Leadership matters ... (click for more)