Dove Season Opens On Sunday In Tennessee

Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Dove season opens on Sunday, at noon (local time), which marks the annual start of one of Tennessee’s most long-standing outdoor sports traditions.

Tennessee’s 2013 season will again be divided into three segments: Sept. 1 through Sept. 26; Oct. 12 through Oct. 27; and Dec. 19 through Jan. 15. Hunting times, other than opening day, are one-half hour before sunrise until sunset for all other days.

In addition to the start of dove season, the early season for Canada goose also starts on Sept. 1 and runs through Sept. 15. There is a daily bag of five for Canada goose.

Doves are found throughout the various regions in the state, but the highest concentration is in farming areas. The hunter must have in his/her possession a valid state hunting license and Tennessee Migratory Bird Permit at all times while hunting. Hunters must have landowner’s permission to hunt on private land.

The daily bag limit is 15. There is no limit on collared doves. Doves not readily identifiable as collared doves will be considered mourning doves and will count toward the mourning dove daily bag limit. No person shall take migratory game birds by the aid of baiting, or on or over any baited area. Any auto-loading or repeating shotgun must be incapable of holding more than three shells while dove hunting.

More information on Tennessee’s dove season can be found on the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency website ( under the “For Hunters” section. The 2013 Tennessee Hunting & Trapping Guide can also be viewed on the website or a copy may be obtained at any TWRA regional office or wherever hunting and fishing licenses are sold.

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