35th Mountaineer Folk Festival Is Sept. 6-8 At Fall Creek Falls

Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - by Amanda Stravinsky

The 35th annual Mountaineer Folk Festival will provide a weekend of traditional music, country cooking and more Sept. 6-8 at Fall Creek Falls State Park.

The three-day festival kicks off 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 6, with a dance presentation by the Rhythm Express Cloggers. Leroy Troy Boswell, an old-time musician and showman will be the featured performer of the night. There will also be square dancing as the Roan Mountain Hilltoppers and the Blue Creek Ramblers play music.

Pioneer demonstrations of blacksmithing, spinning, weaving, broom and soap making and more, storytelling, craft displays and food booths will begin at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 7.

Saturday’s music lineup includes favorites such as The West Girls, Catoosa Canyon, Cumberland, Old Time Travelers, Tommy McCarroll and Roy Harper.

Music stages will open at noon Sept. 8, highlighting both gospel and traditional secular music. Norman Blake, the special musical guest of the day and a well-known guitar picker and singer noted for his performance on the Emmy-winning soundtrack “O’ Brother, Where Art Thou?” will perform at 3 p.m. Sunday’s music lineup also includes Lou Wamp and the Bluetastics, Cannon Creek, Hickory Wind and The Gilbert Family.

A Civil War encampment will feature cannon firing and drills. Over 100 craft booths will display an array of handmade wares, including woodworking, wrought iron, folk art, soaps and candles, leatherworks and basket weaving.

The event is open to the public and there is a suggested $3 per day entry fee or $6 for entry during the entire weekend, with all proceeds benefiting the festival.

For more information, visit www.tnstateparks.com/FallCreekFalls.  

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