Unum Sponsors Educational Programs at Chattanooga History Center

Capital campaign surpasses $9.4 million as museum prepares to open in early 2014

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

The Chattanooga History Center proudly announces today that it has received a $350,000 donation from Unum, bringing the company’s overall support of the Center’s capital campaign to $500,000.  In conjunction with this donation, Unum will become the official sponsor of the educational programs at the Chattanooga History Center and the presenting sponsor for the Center’s Orientation Theater, which will feature a 10-minute introductory firm narrated by Oscar-nominated actor and Chattanooga native Samuel L.

Jackson. With this donation, the Center’s capital campaign has now surpassed $9.4 million as the museum prepares to open its door in early 2014. 

“One of our core values as a company is a strong commitment to our communities. Our continued support of the Chattanooga History Center and its educational programs is an extension of this commitment to the Chattanooga community.” said Rick McKenney, executive vice president and chief financial officer with Unum. “We look forward to working with the Center and supporting its ongoing efforts to connect children and young adults to the past, present and future of Chattanooga in a manner that will inspire them to become tomorrow’s leaders and help build a stronger community.”

Currently, the Chattanooga History Center offers a wide variety of curriculum-aligned programs for students attending grades 1-12 in local private and public schools. Some of the educational programs are site-specific and/or include tours of local historical landmarks while other programs can be taken directly to the school or any other adequate facility. For more information about how to schedule an educational program for a local school, please contact (423) 265-3247.

“This exciting news comes at an important time for the Chattanooga History Center as we work to conclude our capital campaign to build a world-class social history museum that benefits local residents and has a lasting impact on our community,” said Cannon and Rick Montague, co-chairs of the capital campaign for the Chattanooga History Center. “We want to personally thank Unum and its employees for their generous donation and continued support of our mission at the Chattanooga History Center.  The philanthropic support from the local business community has been incredible, and it’s our hope that the Unum donation will encourage others to get involved and support this endeavor in the coming months.”

Unum now joins the city of Chattanooga, the state of Tennessee and several other private individual donors as the major contributors to the $10.5 million capital campaign.  For nearly two years, the Center has been working with internationally renowned Ralph Appelbaum Associates to design and build the new 19,500-square-foot social history museum in the Ross's Landing Park and Plaza (Aquarium Plaza).    

Scheduled to open its doors in early 2014, the Chattanooga History Center will features a series of creative, dynamic exhibits that use storytelling and the power of the narrative to share the compelling story of Chattanooga’s past and impart a memorable, emotional experience that will inspire visitors to take action and help shape Chattanooga’s future. Ralph Appelbaum Associates has successfully used this innovative approach for their award-winning designs at many of the nation’s top museums, including the U.S. Holocaust Museum, The Country Music Hall of Fame, The NASCAR Museum, The National World War I Museum and the Newseum. 

 

For further information on the Chattanooga History Center and its ongoing capital campaign, please visit www.chattanoogahistory.org.


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