State Supreme Court Appoints Solicitor General Bill Young To Administrative Director Of The Courts

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

The Tennessee Supreme Court announced today the appointment of Bill Young as the next administrative director of the Administrative Office of the Courts.

Mr. Young, who has served as solicitor general in the Tennessee Attorney General’s office for more than two years, will take the helm at the AOC later this year.

“Bill Young’s years of experience in the attorney general’s office, especially as solicitor general, and in the private sector, as general counsel for BlueCross BlueShield, place him in good stead to lead the administration of the judiciary for years to come,” said Tennessee Supreme Court Chief Justice Gary Wade. 

Mr. Young is taking on the position held for seven years by Libby Sykes, who announced in August that she will retire later this year, after serving 27 years in state government.

“Libby Sykes has represented the judiciary with the utmost integrity, performed her tasks with skill, and displayed an extraordinary work ethic. Her primary asset has been the compassion for the people she has served,” Wade said. “Bill Young brings those same qualities to the office.” 

As solicitor general, Mr. Young’s responsibilities include oversight of all federal and state appeals involving the state of Tennessee and opinions issued by the Tennessee attorney general’s office. The solicitor general is also part of the Tennessee attorney general’s senior management team.

"Bill has been an outstanding solicitor general who has brought great legal and personal skills to a demanding job. The office will miss his counsel, and we wish him the best of luck in his new position," said Tennessee Attorney General Robert Cooper.

The Tennessee Supreme Court appointed Mr. Young in 2009 to serve on the Access to Justice Commission, which he still serves on today. He was a member of the Tennessee Judicial Nominating Commission from 2009 to August 2011, and was chair of the commission from August 2010 to August 2011.

Mr. Young will spend some time wrapping up business at the attorney general’s office and then begin the transition to the AOC. 

“I appreciate the tremendous opportunity provided to me by the Supreme Court and look forward to serving in this capacity,” he said. 

Prior to joining the attorney general’s office, Mr. Young was senior vice president, chief compliance officer, and general counsel of BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee. He also worked previously as assistant attorney general and senior counsel in the attorney general’s office, was deputy commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Commerce and Insurance, president of Hospital Alliance of Tennessee, general counsel for the Tennessee Hospital Association, and university counsel for Vanderbilt University. He also worked in private practice and was a law clerk to U.S. Bankruptcy Judge George Paine. 

Mr. Young received his bachelor of arts cum laude from Vanderbilt University, where he also earned his juris doctor in 1981. He is a native of Clarksville. hHs wife, Jane, serves as general counsel for the Tennessee Department of Health. The couple live in Nashville and have one daughter, Beth, who is pursuing a master’s degree in accounting at Wake Forest University. 

Mr. Young currently serves as vice chair on the board of directors of Park Center in Nashville and is incoming chairperson. He is a member of the American Bar Association, Tennessee Bar Association, the Inns of Court, and the American Health Lawyers Association.

The Tennessee Supreme Court is a governing body of the judicial branch of state government and the administrative director acts as the chief executive officer with the primary responsibility of developing the annual budget, supervising a staff of 75 employees in six divisions, and providing administrative support for all court personnel throughout the state, including the appellate and trial courts, general sessions, juvenile, and municipal judges, and clerks of court throughout the state. The administrative director also serves on several statewide commissions.


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