UTC Commemorates Constitution Day With Lecture Tuesday

Monday, September 16, 2013

Bradley Birzer will speak on When St Paul Met Aeneas in Philadelphia: The Classical and Christian Origins of the American Founding, on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in the UTC University Center Auditorium. This event is free and open to the public.  It is sponsored by the Center for Reflective Citizenship, a unit of the UTC School of Education devoted to the revitalization of civic education. 

This lecture seeks to contextualize the founding of the nation and the creation of the Constitution by exploring Christian and Greco-Roman influences on the political climate during the time.

“The founders drew heavily from both the Christian and Greco-Roman cultural traditions in thinking about everything from the nature of human beings and what has worked effectively in the past politically,” says Dr. Lucien Ellington, UC Foundation professor and co-founder of the Center for Reflective Citizenship “The founders were incredibly well versed in the Old Testament and the New Testament and in the classics from ancient Greece and Rome. This is sort of like the cultural air that the founders breathed.” 

Dr. Birzer is a professor in History at Hillsdale College, Michigan. He is Russel Amos Kirk chair in American Studies, chairman of the Board of Academic Advisors for the Center for the American Republic, a senior scholar with the Intercollegiate Studies Institute, and a fellow with the Mitch McConnell Center. Birzer was also recently named one of the 25 best living scholars of American history by CSPAN. The lecture will be followed by a 15-minute question and answer session with Dr. Birzer.

“This is an incredibly important topic in really understanding the political and cultural context of the American founding. And Birzer is passionate, engaging, and a great speaker,” Dr. Ellington says. “People will really learn how these two political traditions relate.” 

This event will include pocket sized versions of the U.S. Constitution.

Constitution Day commemorates the signing of the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787. It became a national observance when Senator Robert Byrd passed a bill designating Sept. 17 as an annual day of remembrance and education about the U.S. Constitution. Each year, UTC hosts educational lectures focusing on the Constitution. 

In past years, UTC has commemorated Constitution Day by inviting other nationally recognized speakers to lecture on our campus. In 2012, Dr. James W. Ceaser, Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia and director of the Program for Constitutionalism and Democracy, presented, “The Ties That Bind: What We Feel For Our Constitution.” This lecture discussed how important the Constitution is, not only legally, but also as a powerful symbol of our national cohesion. 


University Hosts Award-Winning Author Janisse Ray

Award-winning author, naturalist, and activist Janisse Ray will give a talk on the UTC campus about heirloom seeds, agrodiversity and the future of food. The event is scheduled for Thursday at 7 p.m. in the Raccoon Mountain Room of the UTC University Center. This program is presented by the Tennessee Valley chapter of Wild Ones and UTC Department of Biological and Environmental ... (click for more)

Dalton State Program Gives Non Students Chance To Further Their Education

Lynda Shenefield had an idea for a book.  But she needed help. Shenefield had no idea how to get her book published.  Then she saw a news release about an epublishing course offered at Dalton State, and thought that would be the perfect opportunity to learn what she needed to know.  At 63, Ms. Shenefield didn’t want to go through the process of enrolling as a student ... (click for more)

DA Looking Into Issue Of County Commission Candidate's Campaign Sending Filled-Out Request For Absentee Ballot To Elderly Voters

The District Attorney's Office has been provided with documents that a County Commission candidate's campaign sent filled-out requests for absentee ballots to elderly voters. Kerry Steelman, election administrator, said there have been four instances in which such requests came from the Elect John Brooks campaign. He said state law says in Section 2-6-202:  (3) A person ... (click for more)

Graham Says County School-City Lawsuit Settlement "Stinks," But County Commission Approves It

The County Commission on Wednesday approved a settlement of a lawsuit brought by the Hamilton County Schools against the city of Chattanooga, though several commissioners said they were not happy with the deal and Commissioner Joe Graham said it "stinks." Commissioner Graham was the lone no vote. He was joined by Commissioner Tim Boyd in a failed effort to defer it a week. ... (click for more)

The Truth From Weston’s Sister - And Response (2)

I try not to read the negative articles and opinions about my older brother. Growing up around politics, I learned a long time ago that thick skin is not only necessary, it’s paramount. But this time, the lies and the rumors and the inaccurate information has gone too far. It’s too ridiculous for me to ignore. So let’s clear a few things up: Weston and I do not “come ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Oscar Brock’s True Passion

I don’t pay much attention to the Hamilton County School Board. Once the moon and the stars aligned behind Superintendent Rick Smith, you hear very little, if anything, from the nine-member council that oversees an annual budget of almost $400 million and employs 4,480 people. So chew this for a minute: approximately 2,000 of those people are not teachers. Yes, there are 78 principals ... (click for more)