Lee University Theatre To Bring Marionettes, Improv And Plays

Monday, September 2, 2013

The 2013-14 theatre season at Lee University will soon be underway, featuring “must see” plays and performances.

The Lee University Theatre season begins with a public performance of “Cinderella” by guest artists Tanglewood Marionettes from Ware, Mass. This performance will take place on Thursday, Sept. 12 at 7 p.m. in the Dixon Center. Tickets will be $5 and available soon.

Tanglewood Marionettes, founded in 1993, is a nationally touring marionette theater based in New England. The theater has received two UNIMA awards, an award that recognizes and rewards puppetry arts throughout the country.

“Cinderella” is a Tanglewood Marionettes showpiece. It is set in the 18th century and features 12 costumed 30-inch marionettes. The story is based on the original fairy tale with a few new twists. The production is recommended for grade levels K-6.  

This children’s theatre event is made possible in part by The Tennessee Arts Commission Grant given to Lee University for the fourth consecutive year.

The season will continue with Agatha Christie’s “The Mousetrap” running Oct. 10-14. The performance will be held in the Edna Minor Conn Theatre and directed by Tenika Dye, an adjunct professor at Lee.

“The Mousetrap,” a murder mystery, has the longest initial run of any play in history. The play follows a London inn and its proprietors, a husband and wife, as they investigate their guests to solve a murder.

“33 Variations,” written by Moises Kaufman, will run Nov. 1-2 and Nov. 7-9.  The play intertwines the story of two geniuses, Beethoven and musicologist Katherine Brandt, as they both face life-altering medical conditions.  A story of hope and reconciliation, "33 Variations" traces the development of Beethovens' famed masterpieces from a simple theme by a "nobody" music publisher into some of the greatest works ever written for the piano.  

The play also features Siyao Li of Lee's School of Music playing many of the variations during the play.  The performance, held in the Dixon Center, will be directed by Associate Professor of Theatre Dr. Christine Williams.

In February, Lee Theatre will bring "Tragedy: A Tragedy” to the stage. The play, written by Will Eno, is an absurdist comedy calling into question our obsession with "breaking news" and forces us to ponder the role of media in our lives.  

Directed by Williams, “Tragedy: A Tragedy” will run Feb. 20-24 and will be performed in the Edna Minor Conn Theatre.

Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing” will run April 4-5 and April 10-12. This comedic play combines elements of robust hilarity with more serious topics of honor, shame and court politics. The story features two young couples, with amusingly contrasting relationships, and their journeys to sincere love.

The performance will be directed by Lee Assistant Professor of Theatre Dan Buck.

Along with the traditional theatre performances, Lee University’s Improv team Shenanigans will perform Dec. 3 and April 29.

Shenanigans started in 2007 as Lee's first Improv team. Skits are unscripted, featuring a set of various games that encourage the creativity of both actors and audience.  

“The Shenanigans’ shows are great fun and perfect for the whole family,” said Williams.  

Tickets for Lee University Theatre productions are $10 for adults and $7 for seniors/students, with the exception of Shenanigans. Tickets for Shenanigans are $1 per person.  

For showtimes and other information, please call 423 614-8343 or email theatre@leeuniversity.edu. Fans can also join the Facebook page "Lee University Theatre."

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