Tennessee Highway Patrol Graduates 7 Canine Teams

Monday, September 23, 2013

The Tennessee Highway Patrol (THP) graduated seven new canine teams in a special ceremony held on Friday at the agency’s Training Center in Nashville. The canine graduates all specialize in explosive detection. 

This is the second canine graduation this year.  In March, the agency held a drug detection canine course and graduation.

This six-week training course focused on teaching canines to assist their handlers in the detection of explosive materials.

The dogs are taught to demonstrate a passive response by sitting when explosive substances are discovered.

“The canines play an important role in securing the safety of the citizens of Tennessee.  They work with their handlers in different capacities within the eight THP Districts, the Special Operations Unit and the State Capitol. They are trusted members of the THP and loyal family members to their handlers,” Colonel Tracy Trott said.

Sgt. Charles Williams, who served as the canine trainer for this course, also instructed his new partner on explosive detection. The graduating teams were presented with a certificate and badge at the ceremony.

The new handlers and their canines are listed below.  

Trooper John Carr and Cheyenne (Belgian Malinois) – THP Knoxville District

Trooper Kyle Millsaps and Demi (Belgian Malinois) – THP Chattanooga District

Trooper Denney Mitchell and Dayzee (Belgian Malinois) – THP Special Operations

Trooper Scott Pollard and Nina (Belgian Malinois) – THP Special Operations

Trooper Michael Morgan and Karo (German Shepherd) – THP Capitol Detail

Trooper Brian Carmouche and Tommy (German Shepherd) – THP Capitol Detail

Sergeant Charles Williams and Tonja (Belgian Malinois) – THP Training Center

With the addition of the new graduates, the Highway Patrol now has 31 canines, including 12 drug detectors, 10 explosive detectors, seven on road patrol, and a cadaver and tracking dog, respectively. 


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