Ringgold Hosts 150th Civil War Reenactment October 5-6

Wednesday, September 25, 2013
Sketch by Alfred Waud who traveled with the Union Army during the Battle of Ringgold Gap.  Located in the center of the image is the Historic Ringgold Train Depot which remains a focal point of downtown even today.
Sketch by Alfred Waud who traveled with the Union Army during the Battle of Ringgold Gap. Located in the center of the image is the Historic Ringgold Train Depot which remains a focal point of downtown even today.

The City of Ringgold, GA will be hosting a Civil War Reenactment of their own on Saturday October 5th and Sunday October 6th on Robin Road near downtown Ringgold.

The Ringgold Downtown Development Authority (DDA) is co-sponsoring the event to bring history alive for visitors from across the region.  The DDA has been working with area re-enactor Fred Ufford to help coordinate the event and help commemorate an important anniversary in Ringgold's history.

When asked about what spectators can expect to see, Mr.

Ufford explained that there will be "At least 200 re-enactors from Hardee's Guard Battalion, Georgia Division, Alabama Division, 52nd Georgia Regiment, and Marshall's Artillery."  The event will close Robin Road between Alabama Hwy 151 and Lafayette Street to accommodate the soldiers' camps and parking for the event.

The reenactment will commemorate "the historic stand of Patrick Cleburne's division of 4,100 battle hardened Confederates against Joseph Hook's Corp of over 15,000 soldiers at Ringgold, Georgia," explained Ufford. "There will be period sutters with authentic reproduction items as well as souvenirs," said Mr. Ufford.

Mr. Ufford has been a Civil War re-enactor for several years and participated in a number of major battles across the south. Ufford works in the Walker County Regional Heritage and Train Museum in downtown Chickamauga, GA and has had an interest in history his whole life and is enthusiastic about Ringgold's rich Civil War heritage. "In 1962 there was a Great Locomotive Chase Centennial celebration with 'The General' at the Depot," he explained, I was there as a little boy dressed as (you guessed it) a rebel soldier."

Joseph Brellenthin, Ringgold's Director of Downtown Development, has been coordinating the event says, "Growing up in the south, I've been to several reenactments in Alabama and Tennessee, but the fact that this is the 150th anniversary of such an important event in our region's history makes it a special day for Ringgold citizens."  The Battle of Ringgold Gap occurred on November 27th, 1863 as Major General Patrick Cleburne staged a rear-guard defense of the retreating Confederate forces after their loss at the Battle of Chattanooga.  "Ringgold really is the last major engagement of the siege of Chattanooga," said Mr. Brellenthin, "so for folks from around the area that have enjoyed the different historical events this season, hopefully they'll get a chance to catch this as the finale."

Re-enactors will begin camping and setting up on Friday, October 4th and open their camps to visitors at 1:00 pm.  The reenactment commemorating the 150th Battle of Ringgold Gap will take place at 2:00 pm on Saturday, October 5th at Clark Park on Robin Road off Alabama Highway 151.  Parking will open at 11:00 am and tickets will be $3 for adults and $1 for children with proceeds going to the Ringgold Downtown Development Authority.

For more information contact Ringgold City Hall at (706)-935-3061 or Hardee's Guard Battalion Re-enactors at (706)-375-3289.

Statue of Major General Patrick Cleburne near Downtown Ringgold Georgia.
Statue of Major General Patrick Cleburne near Downtown Ringgold Georgia.

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