State Library and Archives to Host Workshop on Andrew Jackson October 26

Monday, September 30, 2013

Historians have traditionally presented Andrew Jackson as a man who struggled to overcome the obstacles of his backwoods upbringing and helped create a more democratic United States. Jackson served as the seventh president of the United States, and is considered the hero of the Battle of New Orleans. In his public life, Jackson is best known for his fight to defeat the Second Bank of the United States and for the controversial relocation of Native Americans from the southeastern United States to Oklahoma.

With that in mind, the Tennessee State Library and Archives (TSLA) is hosting the latest in its series of workshops, titled "Andrew Jackson: Frontiersman or Elite Southerner?" The workshop, which is free and open to the public, will be held October 26 from 9:30 a.m. until 11 a.m. at the State Library and Archives building, 403 Seventh Avenue North in downtown Nashville.

Dr. Mark R. Cheathem, author of the recently published book, Andrew Jackson, Southerner, will lead the workshop. Dr. Cheathem argues for a reassessment of long-held views on Jackson, suggesting that in fact "Old Hickory" lived as an elite southern gentleman. By emphasizing Jackson's southern identity - characterized by violence, honor, kinship, slavery, and Manifest Destiny - Dr. Cheathem offers a bold new perspective on one of the most renowned and controversial presidents.

Dr. Cheathem is an associate professor of history at Cumberland University in Lebanon. In addition to Andrew Jackson: Southerner (2013), he is the author of Old Hickory’s Nephew: The Political and Private Struggles of Andrew Jackson Donelson (2007).

Those wishing to attend this free workshop must contact TSLA to reserve a seat as the number of attendees is limited. Due to construction, parking is limited around the Library and Archives building. Patrons can register by telephone by calling 615-741-2764, or by e-mail at: workshop.tsla@tn.gov.



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