Jonathan Lee Named TWRA Wildlife Officer Of The Year For The SEAFWA

Thursday, September 5, 2013
Jonathan Lee
Jonathan Lee

Jonathan Lee has been named the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) Wildlife Officer of the Year for the Southeastern Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (SEAFWA).

The recipient of the award was announced by Darren Rider, TWRA Boating and Law Enforcement Division Chief.

Mr. Lee is a wildlife officer in TWRA Region II’s District 21 and was selected among other TWRA law enforcement officers to become the state recipient. He will be recognized at the annual SEAFWA meeting in October, which this year will be held in Oklahoma City. Mr. Lee is assigned to Rutherford County but works throughout the 12 counties in District 21.

Also honored as TWRA region and district selections were Stephen Graves, Region I and Ed Gover, District 11; Mark Ventura, District 22; Johnny Poston, Region III and Kip Kite, District 32: Wade Young, Region IV and James McAfee, District 42.  The officers were selected for their efforts in teamwork, public outreach, innovation, attitude, leadership, achievements and accomplishments.

“It’s always a difficult situation when one officer is selected out of a group of officers that have all gone above and beyond the duty of ensuring Tennessee hunters, anglers and boaters are provided safe and enjoyable recreational opportunities,” said Mr. Rider. “All these officers are to be commended for their professionalism and efforts they displayed this year. All these officers had a fantastic year, but Jonathan really excelled in all aspects of his job. His teamwork and outreach efforts were outstanding.”

 Among his activities during the year, Mr. Lee conducted six school programs for 525 students and a “Hunter’s Night Out” program for 400 people.  He held a youth fishing event. Mr. Lee taught six hunter education courses in which 173 students were certified.  He assisted with the National Wild Turkey Federation convention and the state championships for the National Archery in the Schools Program. 

He instructed high school students at the Tennessee Outdoor Youth Summit held in Montgomery County, assisted with a fishing trip for wounded soldiers, and also assisted in a landowner’s program for hog eradication.

“Jonathan’s efforts in excellence and innovation were also great,” said Mr. Rider.  “He was able to put his prior training and skills with the military to use by training and qualifying all of Region II’s commissioned officers with the newly issued M-16 rifles.”

Mr. Lee attended an Officer Down training that taught both active shooter situations and combat first aid. These techniques will be passed on to his fellow officers during future trainings.

Mr. Lee was involved in helping rescue a critically injured teen on a Wildlife Management Area.  After a 911 call in regard to the accident, Mr. Lee used his knowledge of the area and was able to locate the teenager a mile from the road and direct a medical air lift helicopter to the scene.

Mr. Lee’s attitude and leadership efforts are also to be commended, according to Mr. Rider.  “He is dedicated to promoting TWRA and serving the citizens of Tennessee” said Mr. Rider.  “He approaches his job with sincerity while maintaining a professional demeanor.”

Mr. Lee made field contact with 363 hunters and anglers and 291 boaters.  These contacts resulted in 104 citations. He assisted with 17 boaters in need of assistance and helped in the recovery a stolen boat.  

PHOTOS: ChattaJack 31

Chattajack 2016 was the biggest yet with approximately 500 racers from all over the USA, Hawaii, Canada, the Caribbean, all the way to New Zealand.  The race travels 31 miles through the scenic Tennessee River Gorge. This year, brutal headwinds challenged racers for most of the race. The fastest time was done on a surfski (4hours & 4 minutes) and the race cut off ... (click for more)

Motorists Urged To Be Cautious To Avoid Deer This Fall

Motorists are urged to exercise caution during the fall season as this is a time of peak deer activity, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division. “Motorists should be alert and pay close attention to the roadsides as we are nearing the annual peak time of the year for deer-car collisions,” said Charlie Killmaster, state deer biologist ... (click for more)

School Board Chooses Charlotte Firm For Superintendent Search Firm; Lennon, Testerman Want To Keep Kelly

The County School Board on Thursday night voted 5-4 to choose a Charlotte, N.C., search firm to pick a new county school superintendent. Coleman Lew and Associates was selected over McPherson & Jacobson of Omaha. That vote came after board members Kathy Lennon and David Testerman started the session by saying they are very pleased with Interim Supt. Kirk Kelly and would ... (click for more)

Judge Finds Young Guilty Of Lesser Charge In Fatal Wreck On Highway 58

Judge Tom Greenholtz on Wednesday found William Henry Young guilty of a lesser charge in a fatal traffic accident on Highway 58. The judge, who heard the case without a jury, ruled the 56-year-old former TVA employee guilty of criminally negligent homicide. He had been charged with vehicular homicide. Sentencing will be in December. Judge Greenholtz dismissed charges ... (click for more)

Accountability Doesn't Have To Be A Bad Word

Am I making a difference? Isn’t that the basic question we all ask ourselves, and seek to demonstrate to others?  Ronald Reagan said:  “Some people spend an entire lifetime wondering if they made a difference in the world. But, the Marines don't have that problem.”   We would argue teachers do not have that problem either.    Educators make a huge difference ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: Guess Who Backed Kelly?

Two weeks before the August election where three members of the Hamilton County School Board were angrily replaced, the organizer of what was called “a great way for the (challengers) to raise great money to help them run smart campaigns” made a bold statement. “I'm sure the current board is well-intentioned, but the results are not there," said Paul Brock. "Leadership matters ... (click for more)