Hunter Education Course Options Offered In Georgia

Friday, September 6, 2013

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division offers three ways for the public to take hunter education classes:  an eight-hour online course followed by a two-hour review or the 10-hour traditional classroom course.

“Because of the importance of the information learned in a hunter education course, our agency has made efforts to meet the needs of many users,” says Walter Lane, hunter development program manager with the Wildlife Resources Division.  “The online courses offer more scheduling flexibility as they can be done at any time of day.  And for those who prefer a traditional method, the classroom courses provide a face-to-face opportunity with instructors.”

The classroom course is free of charge.  The three available online courses each require a fee (from $9.95 - $24.95) but all are “pass or don’t pay” courses.  Fees for these courses are charged by and collected by the independent course developer.  If the online course vendor fees are an obstacle, students can obtain a CD-ROM by contacting their local DNR law enforcement office.

Completion of a hunter education course is required for any person born on or after Jan. 1, 1961, who:

·         purchases a season hunting license in Georgia.

·         is at least 12 years old and hunts without adult supervision.

·         hunts big game (deer, turkey, bear) on a wildlife management area.

The only exceptions include any person who:

·         purchases a short-term hunting license, such as the Apprentice License or the 3-day Hunting and Fishing Combo License (as opposed to a season license).

·         is hunting on his or her own land, or that of his or her parents or legal guardians.

For more information, go to www.gohuntgeorgia.com/hunting/education or call 770 761-3010. 


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