Inaugural Chattanooga Burger Battle Held To Benefit The Forgotten Child Fund

Monday, September 9, 2013

The Forgotten Child Fund partnered with LOCAL RMD to organize the 2013 Chattanooga Burger Battle presented by US Foods on Saturday. The event was held to spotlight the talent of local chefs and their hamburgers as well as to raise money for the Forgotten Child Fund.

The Honest Pint was awarded Chattanooga’s Favorite Burger after a closely contested popular vote. The Honest Pint’s entry was “This Burger is the Jam Burger” a “half pint” burger topped with caramelized onions, melted blue cheese and on top—the true apex—house made bacon jam, all served on a fresh bun donated by Niedlov’s Breadworks.

In the judged categories, Tremont Tavern earned the award for Chattanooga’s Best Classic Burger for the aptly named “Tavern Burger” and Armando’s at Chester Frost Park was presented with the award for Chattanooga’s Best Extreme Burger for the “PBJ”. All entries were judged by Chef Charlie Loomis, Chef Erik Niel of Easy Bistro and Cowboy Kyle of US101.

Over 200 people came down to Patten Parkway to sample the best hamburgers from Armando’s at Chester Frost, Blacksmith’s Gastropub, Hair of the Dog, The Honest Pint, Southern Burger Co. and Tremont Tavern. Everyone enjoyed soft drinks provided by the Double Cola Co. and a Loaded French Fry Bar courtesy of the Southern Burger Co. Between tastings, attendees played cornhole, listened to music from US101 and enjoyed drinks from The Terminal served by On The List Catering.

Special thanks to US Foods, The Double Cola Co., Chattanooga Tshirt.com, Santek Waste Services, Dpi Color Graphics and Cadence Coffee for making the Chattanooga Burger Battle possible. 


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