Tenney To Speak At Dalton State

Monday, September 9, 2013

Matt Tenney has spent time as a prisoner, a monk, and now as a social entrepreneur spreading his message of doing well by doing good to audiences near and far. He brings his compelling program on the value of servant leadership to Dalton State in a free program Tuesday, September 24.

After attempting to steal $2.7 million from the U.S. government in 2001, Tenney, then 24, was convicted and sentenced to five and a half years in a military prison. While serving his sentence, Tenney says he transformed his outlook on life, choosing to consider his wrongdoing as not a setback, but a way to move forward.

Upon being released from prison, Mr. Tenney moved to Mexico to live in a monastery. After living as a monk for three years, he founded a non-profit organization, “Kids Kicking Cancer,” and became devoted to teaching the practice of servant leadership. He currently serves as a trainer with the Perth Leadership Institute and travels the country as a motivational speaker. He turns all profits from his speaking engagements over to charity.

 “Matt Tenney’s story had an impact on me,” says Montana Gray, Dalton State student and chair of the Campus Activities Board’s culture and awareness committee. “His beliefs shifted my actions, his kindness melted my cynical shell, and his talk changed me for the better. His presence alone is inspirational.”

Of Mr. Tenney, others have said, “Probably the best speaker I’ve heard at any convention,” and “Terrific! Well-delivered message that should cause each of us to refocus our priorities, lives, and mindsets.”

The program, sponsored by the Office of Student Life, is free and open to the public. Mr. Tenney will speak in Goodroe Auditorium in Dalton State College’s Gignilliat Memorial Hall on Tuesday September 24 at 7:30 pm. Seating is first come, first served.



Nuclear Regulatory Commission Awards Scholarship Funds To Chattanooga State

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has awarded $146,845 to fund scholarships for students in nuclear-related programs at Chattanooga State Community College. The donation made to the Chattanooga State’s Nuclear Scholarship Program will provide 32 scholarships to full-time students majoring in one of four nuclear-related programs of study in the Engineering ... (click for more)

New $1.1 Million Gift Establishes W. Max Finley Chair For Excellence In American Business At UTC

Continuing a legacy of support for UTC, a $1.1 million gift from the Finley family has created the W. Max Finley Chair for Excellence in American Business to honor the entrepreneurial energy and career of the late W. Max Finley, former chairman of the RockTenn Corporation.  The W. Max Finley Chair will employ or retain a distinguished faculty member for the UTC College of ... (click for more)

Deputy Beaten After Vehicle Crashes In His Yard Sues Officers

A man who was mistakenly beaten by officers who had been pursuing a pickup truck that crashed into his home has sued Hamilton County and the officers for $700,000. Aaron Lucas Shelton and his wife, Heather Nicole Shelton, filed the suit in Circuit Court. Aaron Shelton is himself a deputy sheriff. It names Curtis Brian Killingsworth and unknown officers who allegedly took part ... (click for more)

Signal Council, Residents Concerned About Unsafe Driving En Route To Schools

The town council of Signal Mountain is dealing with a traffic problem caused by increased traffic to and from Signal Mountain Middle High School and Nolan Elementary. Mayor Dick Gee said, “This is a tough issue that we wouldn’t have to deal with if everyone would drive responsibly.” The main concern is for safety and in November the council agreed to try to fix the problem by ... (click for more)

We Ought To Pay Our Own Way

The government is too big. It has never been bigger - by any measure. It spends more money than any other single actor in our society. From Blue Rhinos to providing telecommunications services, our government knows no bounds. We’ve gone from a free enterprise system to a public enterprise system.  I'm not an artist. I'm not terribly tech savvy. The part of government that ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: My Garden On March 1

As I try to do at the beginning of each month, I stroll through my garden to see the good and the bad. This morning there is still a solid covering of snow but, as usual, there is still a lot to see. March is historically known for “coming in like a lion and leaving like a lamb” so let’s see who gets what: A LAMB to the fact 90-year-old Floyd Hartwig of Easton, Calif., and his ... (click for more)