Tennessee Big Brothers Big Sisters’ CEOs Join Governor Haslam To Recognize January As Mentoring Month

Friday, January 17, 2014
Pictured, from left to right, front row: Special Advisor to the Governor, Big Brother Randy Boyd; Big Brothers Big Sisters’ CEO Ansel Peak (Greater Chattanooga area); CEO Amy Carroll (Clarksville area); Governor Bill Haslam; CEO Adrienne Bailey (Greater Memphis area); CEO Doug Kose (Knoxville-East Tennessee area); CEO Carlyle Carroll (Nashville-Middle Tennessee area); top row: Sen. Bo Watson; Rep. Richard Floyd; Rep. Larry Miller; Rep. Harry Brooks; Department of Correction Commissioner Derrick D. Schofield; and Rep. John Ragan.
Pictured, from left to right, front row: Special Advisor to the Governor, Big Brother Randy Boyd; Big Brothers Big Sisters’ CEO Ansel Peak (Greater Chattanooga area); CEO Amy Carroll (Clarksville area); Governor Bill Haslam; CEO Adrienne Bailey (Greater Memphis area); CEO Doug Kose (Knoxville-East Tennessee area); CEO Carlyle Carroll (Nashville-Middle Tennessee area); top row: Sen. Bo Watson; Rep. Richard Floyd; Rep. Larry Miller; Rep. Harry Brooks; Department of Correction Commissioner Derrick D. Schofield; and Rep. John Ragan.

Big Brothers Big Sisters’ Tennessee Alliance joined Governor Bill Haslam in proclaiming January as Mentoring Month for Tennessee.  The governor encouraged citizens across the State of Tennessee to join him in this worthy observance.

The official presentation was made on Wednesday, at 2:30 p.m. at the Tennessee State Capitol. The goals of Mentoring Month are to raise awareness of mentoring, recruit individuals to mentor, and encourage organizations to engage and integrate quality mentoring into their efforts.

Joining the governor in recognizing Mentoring Month and the value of high-quality youth mentoring were special advisor to the governor and Big Brother Randy Boyd; Senator Bo Watson; Rep. Richard Floyd; Rep. Larry Miller; Rep. Harry Brooks; Department of Correction Commissioner Derrick D. Schofield; and Rep. John Ragan.

“The Department of Correction values its partnership with Big Brothers Big Sisters to match children of incarcerated parents with mentors. We know that with the support of mentors, many Tennessee children have a better chance at a successful life,” Commissioner Derrick D. Schofield said.

The Big Brothers Big Sisters Tennessee Alliance hopes others will get involved by supporting the efforts of mentoring across the State of Tennessee by volunteering their time and/or donating their resources. Children served through Big Brothers Big Sisters are more likely to achieve educational success, reach for higher aspirations and avoid risky behaviors.


 “I deeply appreciate Governor Haslam drawing attention to the importance of quality youth mentoring”, Ansel Peak, executive director, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Chattanooga commented, “Mentoring Month is the perfect time to recognize the important role mentoring plays in the healthy development of youth, especially those facing adversity and to recognize those who support our one-to-one mentoring efforts.”

More than 4,300 children were served with a Big Brother or Big Sister in 2012 in the state of Tennessee. During Mentoring Month, Big Brothers Big Sisters agencies across the State of Tennessee are recognizing their “Bigs” by thanking them for their service. Each volunteer “Big” is asked to be a mentor to the same child “Little” for at least one year. Once the “Big” and “Little” have been matched, many continue to be matched through the child’s 18th birthday.

You can learn more about Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Chattanooga by visiting www.bbbschatt.org or call 423 698-8016.


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