Slavery: A Continued Legacy Exhibition Opens At Hunter

Friday, January 17, 2014
Kara Elizabeth Walker (b. 1969): Freedom: A Fable, A Curious Interpretation of the Wit of a Negress in Troubled Times with Illustrations, 1997, hand-made book, Collection of the Hunter Museum of American Art, Gift of Cleve Scarbrough, HMAA.1998.1
Kara Elizabeth Walker (b. 1969): Freedom: A Fable, A Curious Interpretation of the Wit of a Negress in Troubled Times with Illustrations, 1997, hand-made book, Collection of the Hunter Museum of American Art, Gift of Cleve Scarbrough, HMAA.1998.1

When it re-opened in 2005, the Hunter Museum of American Art presented a small exhibition focusing on the issue of slavery through works by artists of various ethnic and cultural backgrounds. 

The Hunter Museum now presents a second look at this issue through the lens of more contemporary artists, using some works that have been acquired by the Museum for its permanent collection within the last few years.  

“While we have seen great strides in our nation in terms of racial issues, there are still many challenges ahead of us, and each of the artists represented in this exhibition offers a unique perspective on this rather complex topic,” said Nandini Makrandi, chief curator at the Hunter Museum.

Slavery: A Continued Legacy exhibition, on view Jan. 17-April 6, features a selection of works by African American artists who develop this theme, from celebrations of freedom depicted by Jacob Lawrence and Elizabeth Catlett to the searing paper cuts of Kara Walker and the enigmatic responses to the long history of prejudice by Lorna Simpson and Carrie Mae Weems.  

Special Programs
Art + Issues: Civil Rights, Wrongs, Judgments and Justifications

Feb. 27 | 6 p.m. 

Marcus Ellsworth, president of Tennessee Valley Pride and Host of Wide Open Floor, will explore Civil Rights movements in the black community and in the LGBT community historically and today. Join us for a provocative discussion. Free to all in the community. This is presented in partnership with The AIGA.

Art + Issues: Diversity Is! Now Deal With It?
March 20 | 6 p.m.
Art + Issues will explore the ways we understand and engage with diversity in our community with UTC professors Dr. Bart Weathington, UC Foundation Professor in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, and Dr. Brian O’Leary, Department Head and Associate Professor of Psychology. Free to all in the community. This is presented in partnership with The AIGA.
 

Feb. 27 | 6 p.m. 
Marcus Ellsworth, president of Tennessee Valley Pride and Host of Wide Open Floor, will explore Civil Rights movements in the black community and in the LGBT community historically and today. Join us for a provocative discussion. Free to all in the community. This is presented in partnership with The AIGA.  


Art + Issues: Diversity Is! Now Deal With It?
March 20 | 6 p.m.
Art + Issues will explore the ways we understand and engage with diversity in our community with UTC professors Dr. Bart Weathington, UC Foundation Professor in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, and Dr. Brian O’Leary, Department Head and Associate Professor of Psychology. Free to all in the community. This is presented in partnership with The AIGA.
 
Art Wise: Distinguished Speakers at the Hunter Museum presents 
Virginia Mecklenburg 
March 27 | 6 p.m.
The Hunter welcomes Smithsonian American Art Museum Chief Curator Virginia Mecklenburg. Mecklenburg, one of the curators of our current exhibition, “African American Art: Harlem Renaissance Civil Rights Era and Beyond,” will offer insight into the exhibit. The Art Wise series is generously sponsored by the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Tennessee Community Trust with additional support from Sally and Thomas Faulkner. General admission. 

The Word, the Sound and the Image: Meditations on “Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights and Beyond”
April 10 | 6 p.m.
Join musician, DJ and spoken word poet, Christian Collier, and other local performers as they bring the paintings in our special exhibition to new meaning and life, performing on themes that travel from the past to the present, from the paintings to the living soul. General Admission. 
Hunter Undergraduate Student Symposium: Race In America 

April 27 | 1 p.m.
The First annual Hunter Museum undergraduate symposium featuring paper presentations from students at regional universities on the topic of race in America. This year’s symposium is held in Conjunction with Current Exhibition “African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era and Beyond.” Free to the public. 

Sound and Image: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights and Beyond
May 1 | 6 p.m.
Join UTC Adjunct Professor of Saxophone Clint Schmitt and Hunter curators as they explore the music and visions expressed in the current special exhibition “African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era and Beyond.” 

Theatrequest: Performances of Harlem Renaissance Civil Rights and Beyond
May 22 | 6 p.m.
For this year’s installation of our annual audience favorite, Theaterquest, these talented teen playwrights and actors will perform original works inspired by the Hunter’s current temporary exhibition, "African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights and Beyond.” Free to high school students and their families. Co-presented by the Chattanooga Theatre Center.




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