GPS Remembers Dr. King And The Civil Rights Era

Monday, January 20, 2014

GPS blends technology, QR codes, and, of course, education in a campus-wide remembrance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., beginning Monday. 

For three days, students, faculty, and parents are using their iPads, laptops, and iPhones to visit 12 multi-media stations that offer a glimpse into different Civil Rights issues from the past.

At these stations, set up throughout the school’s campus, a ledger-sized sign features the station’s title/topic, an image from the Civil Rights Era’s past, and a QR code. With their computers or phones, students use the QR code to access a site that provides a description of the topic and illustrates the issue through photography or video, and challenges students with questions. 

The station topics include the following: Look-Ins: Look but don’t watchSit-Ins: Just taking a seatHold It: Nature calls in a segregated worldTransportation: Move to the backLibraries: Separate but equalWater, Water, Everywhere: Can I have a drinkRecreation: No playing togetherGuilty: Prove your innocenceBad Medicine: No mixed blood; Let Me In: School segregationChanging Views: Generation to generation; and GPS: Our past, our future

Included in the texts are quotes by Dr. King from his appearances in Chattanooga. On Dec. 30, 1960, for example, he said, “Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain,” a call that would be echoed later in his famous “I Have a Dream” speech. 

Each student completes a Civil Rights Checklist as she visits the stations, submitting it to the office when completed. Girls are visiting the stations prior to school, during free periods, during activity period and lunch, and after school. 

A special program on Monday afternoon continues the discussion of the remembrance’s questions: "What Has Changed?", "What Remains the Same?" and "What Can I Do to Contribute to the Process?" 

A committee of faculty, helped by GPS parent, alumna, and former Hamilton County Historian Patrice Glass, worked on gathering the information for this unique and innovative approach to commemorating the life of Dr. King and examining Chattanooga’s past.



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