Sixth Cavalry Museum Announces Civil War Lecture Series in February

Monday, January 27, 2014
Cavalry officer and author Jimmy Jones at May 23, 2013, book signing.
Cavalry officer and author Jimmy Jones at May 23, 2013, book signing.
As the nation continues to commemorate the American Civil War (1861 – 1865), the 6th Cavalry Museum will host a lecture series each Saturday in February at the Catoosa County Library’s community room from 1pm – 2:30 pm.  Gerry Depken, local historian and museum board member organized the series to tell about the soldier’s life and experiences and not the specifics of strategic battles and campaigns.  “How did a soldier enlist?  What were the duties of a Cavalry soldier?  The important role music and the regimental band played and the history of the Medal of Honor will all be explored with these lectures,” explained Depken.

The 6th United States Cavalry in the Civil War, a History and Roster written by Donald Caughey and Jimmy Jones will be featured in the February 1st lecture.  Jones is an active duty cavalry officer who has served two tours of duty in the 6th U.S. Cavalry and visited the 6th Cavalry Museum in May, 2013 for a book signing prior to his deployment to Kuwait.  Jones donated copies of his book to the museum and asked that a copy be given to the local libraries.  The 6th Cavalry considers Fort Oglethorpe its home as it was permanently stationed here from 1919 – 1942 at the Army Post at Fort Oglethorpe (1902 – 1947).  The regiment’s museum which had been housed at Fort Meade, MD was permanently moved to Fort Oglethorpe in 1981. 

About the Book

The 6th was the only regular cavalry regiment raised during the Civil War.  Unlike volunteer regiments raised by individual states, this cavalry regiment by war’s end had 2,130 men and at least one woman from 29 states and 14 countries.  The regiment’s initial cast of officers included two grandsons of a former president and a cousin of Confederate President Jefferson Davis.  The book relies heavily on primary sources using diaries and letters of officers and enlisted soldiers alike.  A copy of the book will be given away as a door prize at each lecture.           

Lecture Series

February 1 – “Welcome to the Sixth”: The Newest Cavalry Unit Writes Its History from 1861-1865 – Gerry Depken, Local Historian

February 8 – Forward, Trot, Gallop, Charge: The Work of the Cavalryman and his Horse – Jerry Trollinger, Cavalry Re-enactor

February 15 – Music, Morale and Memories of Home: Till Johnny Comes Marching Home, He’ll Sing of Maryland, My Maryland and Home Sweet Home. – John Carruth, Eighth Regiment Band

February 22 – The Sixth Cavalry exploits of 1863 at The Battle of Brandy Station and History of the Medal of Honor – Jim Wade and George Davenport, Medal of Honor Museum and Chris McKeever, Sixth Cavalry Museum

About the 6th Cavalry Museum

The 6th Cavalry Museum preserves the rich military history of the “Fighting Sixth” Cavalry, stationed at The Post at Fort Oglethorpe (1919 – 1942). Located on the Post’s original parade ground/polo field, the area is listed on the National Register of Historic Sites, surrounded by officers’ homes and other Post buildings. The museum houses artifacts, uniforms, weapons, accouterments, photos, WWII Jeep, Troop Transport Truck and a Patton Tank. For more information, call 706-861-2860 or visit www.6thcavalrymuseum.org.

 

 


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