EPublishing Course Offered At Dalton State In January

Friday, January 3, 2014
Barbara Tucker will teach epublishing at Dalton State. The college class is offered on a non-credit basis to interested members of the community.
Barbara Tucker will teach epublishing at Dalton State. The college class is offered on a non-credit basis to interested members of the community.

For those wanting to learn how to break into epublishing, Dalton State is offering an epublishing course on a non-credit basis.

 “According to a recent announcement from Amazon, one-fourth of the top 100 best-selling books available for its Kindle ereader are from “indie” publishers,” says Barbara Tucker, Associate Professor of Communication, who will teach the epublishing class which starts next week. “Some of us want our work to be available to a wider public; some of us want to write the next important novel; some of us just want to learn what this epublishing stuff is all about,” she said.   

Epublishing is making a book (or writing of any length) available for reading on Kindles, Nooks, iPhones, and other brands of ereaders. Self-epublishing bypasses producing the printed copy of the book and deals only in the digital world—the book never becomes a physical book, but it is still published and available. The most well-known method is through Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing; Barnes and Noble also has a popular program called Nook Press, and there are other companies called aggregators that will allow the author who wants to self-publish to make the work available for brands of ereaders other than Nooks and Kindles. 

“Indie” publishing is the new word for self-publishing, especially in the epublishing, digital world.  Self-publishing is losing some of its negative connotations of the past as more venues for writers are becoming accessible. Epublishing can be lucrative, if an “indie” publisher knows how to use the Internet, social media, and other methods to market his or her work.

The course at Dalton State College will be offered in hybrid format on Tuesdays from 9:25 to 10:40 am during the spring semester. The first class is Tuesday, January 7.  Among topics to be covered are:  the epublishing world, putting your work into formats for ereaders, editing your work, and marketing your book once it’s available for ereaders.

Ms. Tucker is a member of the Chattanooga Writers Guild, a published novelist in traditional and self-epublishing modes, a leader of a writers group that meets in Ft. Oglethorpe, and blogger.

Registration for non-credit students is underway now. Those wanting to know more are invited to contact Dr. Randall Griffus at rgriffus@daltonstate.edu or 706/272-2509, or Sarah Key at skey@daltonstate.edu or 706/272-4556.




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