UT Launches Leadership Development Program In Bradley County

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, College of Business Administration is launching a comprehensive development program geared toward current organizational leaders or those with potential to be on the fast track to leadership.

Registration is now open for the UT Emerging Leaders Series, which begins in January. Participants take classes two days each month between January and June, which limits work disruption. 

The series includes six modules and is designed to be taken as a full series. But participants can sign up for individual modules if desired. The cost is $7,500 for all six modules or $1,600 for any two-day module. The price includes books, classroom materials, lunch and break refreshments. Continuing education credits are available upon request. All modules are taught at the Cleveland/Bradley Chamber of Commerce, 225 Keith Street SW. 

"The 2008 recession delayed retirements of many baby boomers, and organizational training and development budgets were cut," said Ron Solmonson, the UT leadership series director. "With an improving economy, organizations are faced with a potential leadership void. Companies need to have a strong leadership team ready to take the reins if the companies are to remain successful." 

Mr. Solmonson cited a recent study by human resource consulting company Bersin by Deloitte that indicates companies with highly developed leadership programs get seven times better business results than companies with mediocre programs, and they are 12 times more effective at accelerating business growth. 

The six Emerging Leaders Series modules cover a broad range of leadership and management topics: 

Jan. 5-6, 2015: Foundations of Leadership — focuses on enhancing an individual’s leadership self-awareness and predisposition. Participants learn to leverage their leadership strengths and mitigate potential shortcomings.  

Feb. 2-3, 2015: Building Relationships and Effective Communications — develops and enhances participants’ communication skills so they can build effective relationships within and across organizations. 

March 2-3, 2015:  Talent Management Strategies and Solutions — teaches participants proven performance management techniques that help them deliver effective performance appraisals and set realistic goals for their direct reports. It also explains effective employee retention and engagement strategies that decrease turnover and create more stable work forces. 

April 6-7, 2015:  Making Sense of the Numbers:  Finance for Non-financial Management — helps participants better understand how their decisions affect overall company performance. Financial statements and metrics such as contribution margin, working capital and various cost allocations are explained.  

May 4-5, 2015:  The Efficient Manager — teaches participants how to more efficiently use their and their team’s time to improve productivity and employee satisfaction. Participants learn the eight wastes of management and discover countermeasures to reduce that waste and enhance productivity. 

June 1-2, 2015:  Leading for Impact — helps participants deliver impactful results to their organization and articulate their leadership legacy. 

For more information, visit http://emergingleaders.utk.edu.



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