Braves Sign Shortstop Andrelton Simmons To Seven-Year Contract

Thursday, February 20, 2014
Andrelton Simmons
Andrelton Simmons
- photo by Tim Evearitt

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. --  The Braves announced Thursday morning that Andrelton Simmons has signed a seven-year contract extension that will keep him in Atlanta through the end of the 2020 season. The contract is worth $58 million.

Since making his Major League debut midway through the 2012 season, Simmons has established himself as one of the game's elite defensive players. The 24-year-old shortstop was credited with 41 defensive runs saved last year, the highest total recorded by a player since the stat was first used in 2003.

"We believe he is the premier shortstop in the game, and we're thrilled to have him signed through all of his arbitration years and his first two free-agent years," Braves general manager Frank Wren said. "It continues with the theme of keeping our core together for a long time, and we think he's an integral part of that."

The Braves also saw Simmons provide some surprising power courtesy of the 17 home runs he hit while batting .248 in 157 games last year. Optimism regarding his offensive potential was enhanced as he produced a .789 OPS after the All-Star break.

Over the past two weeks, the Braves have given long-term extensions to Simmons, Freddie Freeman, Craig Kimbel, and Julio Teheran. These deals have set the stage for each of these players to still be in Atlanta in 2017, when the club moves to its new stadium in Cobb County.

----  Source: MLB.com

Andrelton Simmons is one of the best defensive shortstops in baseball.
Andrelton Simmons is one of the best defensive shortstops in baseball.
- Photo2 by Tim Evearitt

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