Lee University Tenures Three Faculty

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Lee University’s Board of Directors has awarded tenure to three faculty members. President Paul Conn congratulated the newly tenured faculty, praising them for their excellence in teaching and investments in the lives of students.  Tenured faculty members include LuAnn Holden, Dr. Timothy Miller, and Dr. Heather Quagliana. 

Ms. Holden joined the School of Music as an assistant professor of music education in 1997, where she teaches choral and general music methods courses and supervises student teachers. Ms. Holden served as chair of the Department of Vocal Music from fall 2006 through spring 2011. Prior to Lee, Ms. Holden was a member of the Atlanta Symphony Chorus, which at that time was conducted by the legendary Robert Shaw.  

Ms. Holden presents at state and regional conferences on topics relating to choral rehearsal techniques, such as visual imagery, critical thinking and assessment. She frequently conducts state and regional honor choirs, adjudicates choral festivals, serves as a clinician for choir workshops, and writes choral music reviews for publication in the Choral Journal.

Ms. Holden earned her MA in music education with an emphasis in choral music from Georgia State University and her BA in music education from Wesleyan College in Macon, Ga. Her professional memberships include American Choral Directors Association, National Association for Music Education, Tennessee Music Educators Association, East Tennessee Vocal Association, Choristers Guild and Chorus America.   

Dr. Miller joined the School of Religion as an assistant professor of philosophy in fall 2008. Prior to joining Lee, Dr. Miller was a visiting assistant professor of philosophy at Oklahoma Baptist University. 

Dr. Miller co-edited, with Linda Zagzebski, “Readings in Philosophy of Religion: Ancient to Contemporary.” Other publications include “Desgabets on Cartesian Minds” in the British Journal for the History of Philosophy, “On the Distinction between Creation and Conservation: A Partial Defence of Continuous Creation,” and “Continuous Creation and Secondary Causation: The Threat of Occasionalism in Religious Studies”. In addition to continued work on issues related to continuous creation, he is currently doing research and writing on the rule consequentialist approach to ethical theory.

 Dr. Miller earned his PhD at the University of Oklahoma, specializing in metaphysics, philosophy of religion, and early modern philosophy. His dissertation focused on the traditional doctrine of continuous creation and the problems it raises concerning the nature of causation and persistence; it was awarded the University of Oklahoma’s 2007 dissertation prize for the Fine Arts and Humanities.

Dr. Quagliana joined the College of Arts and Sciences as an assistant professor of psychology in 2008. She teaches courses such as Childhood Disorders and Intervention Strategies, Child Development, Personality Theory, and Community Psychology. Prior to Lee, she taught at Community Christian College in Redlands, Calif., and Azusa Pacific University.

Dr. Quagliana has co-authored numerous book chapters on the integration of spirituality and therapeutic work with children, including the American Psychological Association Press book “Spiritual Interventions in Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy” and “Integrating Scripture with Parent Training in Behavioral Interventions” in the Journal of Psychology and Christianity. She has presented in a variety of American Psychological Association conferences related to her interests in community psychology, foster care children, and families.

Dr. Quagliana’s clinical work and research focuses on children and families. Her specializations include foster care of children, childhood trauma, ADHD, Autism, and expressive therapies. She earned her PhD and MA in clinical psychology, an MA in theology from Fuller Theological Seminary, and her BA from Lee University.



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