ChattState Honors Black History Month

Tuesday, February 4, 2014

 In 1976, Black History Week during February was expanded to a month long celebration in observance of remembering people and events in the history of African-Americans. Chattanooga State Community College will honor Black Americans this month with a variety of events that are free and open to the public.  

ChattState will observe National HIV/AIDS Awareness Day on Wednesday with a program by Jamar Rogers beginning at 10 a.m. in the Humanities Theatre.  Mr. Rogers grew up with a passion for music but during his teen years, he fell prey to drug abuse and contracted HIV. Working to turn his life around for six years, he auditioned and was a finalist on NBC’s The Voice. Mr. Rogers now works as an activist and artist to demystify the misconceptions about HIV and AIDS. 

Former UT defensive end, Inquoris “Inky” Johnson, will visit the campus on Monday bringing his special brand of motivation to listeners. As a boy he dreamed of playing professional sports, but a routine tackle ended that dream, opening him up to a new career as a motivational speaker after completing his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at UTK. Mr. Johnson will address students earlier in the day. At 4 p.m., the Kolwyck Library will host a book signing, followed by a public presentation at 6 p.m. in the Humanities Theatre.

Life-long civil rights activist Margaret Block will present “Freedom Songs and the Civil Rights Movement,” Feb. 25 at 6 p.m. in the Berry Auditorium located in the Health Science Center. As a member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee established in 1960 by civil rights protestors, she helped organize and plan events in Mississippi working alongside well-known members of the Civil Rights movement.

For more information about these events, please contact Mary Knaff at 697-3371, mary.knaff@chattanoogastate.edu or visit www.chattanoogastate.edu



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