“Overdressed” Author Rescheduled At Dalton State

Tuesday, February 04, 2014
Elizabeth Cline
Elizabeth Cline

A lecture by Elizabeth Cline, the New York fashion writer and author of “Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion” has been rescheduled for Thursday, Feb. 13, at 6:30 p.m. in Goodroe Auditorium at Dalton State College.  Ms. Cline, a Whitfield County native, was slated to appear Jan. 30, but the lecture was cancelled due to snow. 

Ms. Cline was raised in Varnell and attended Westwood School before moving with her family to Cairo, Ga. She says she is excited to be visiting home and to spread the word about smart shopping. 

“I still feel very tied to Georgia and come home as often as I can,” she says. “Part of the reason I wanted to write about the fashion industry is because the South used to be the epicenter of textile manufacturing, and I'd love to see garment factories, textile factories, fashion designers, and dye houses booming here again.” 

Now a New York-based writer, author, and public speaker, she began to notice the widespread and deeply rooted obsession with purchasing excessive amounts of inexpensive garments when she took a look at her own closet. Upon discovering that she owned more than 350 items of clothing, Cline decided that it was time to get to the bottom of why Americans are so enthralled with what she calls “disposable clothing.”

“I was just really curious about how retailers are able to sell clothes so cheaply and how low price changes the way we consume,” she said. Over the course of two years, Ms. Cline interviewed various clothing factory owners and workers, designers for popular low-cost retailers, quality control analysts, and production and sourcing experts in the fashion industry. 

When she concluded that the real story wouldn’t come merely from sources in the U.S., she traveled overseas to get the full picture from factories in places like China and Bangladesh. “The experience was eye-opening to say the least,” she said. 

Since researching the overconsumption trend in fashion and gathering the information for “Overdressed,” Ms. Cline has made a few changes to how she purchases clothing. An advocate for “slow fashion,” she urges people to think about how they spend their clothing dollars and to purchase garments that are ethically produced, essential to one’s wardrobe, and are durable and made of quality materials. 

Ms. Cline says that the best places to look for trendy clothing without breaking the bank are places like consignment and thrift stores, as well as your own closet; she will reveal tips on how to shop affordably and ethically during her lecture. 

“It doesn't cost more money to be a conscious clothing consumer,” Ms. Cline says, “It could mean patching your jeans instead of throwing them out, trying to buy items that are well-made and aren't going to fall apart, simply shopping less (most of us have closets full of clothes already), and supporting brands that treat their employers and the planet with care when possible.” 

“The clothing industry takes a huge toll on the environment, jobs, and human lives,” she continues. “I want to empower people to change this industry through the way they shop.” 

Ms. Cline has written blogs and articles for publications such as “The New Yorker,” “Village Voice,” and “New York Magazine,” many of which can be found on her website, www.overdressedthebook.com

Elizabeth Cline will deliver her lecture on “Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion” on Feb. 13 at 6:30 in Goodroe Auditorium in Gignilliat Memorial Hall at Dalton State College. Seating is first come, first served. There will be books for sale and a book signing after the lecture.



Walk At School Event At Red Bank Elementary Friday

Red Bank Elementary students have been participating in walk to school day events.   On Friday, the 5th graders are doing a surprise "flash mob" dance on the last song at 2 p.m.  (click for more)

Tennessee Releases 2014 State Report Card

The 2014 state Report Card­­­­, posted  Thursday  on the Tennessee Department of Education website, offers users the ability to view detailed breakdowns of last year’s student achievement growth and other important data points. The 2014 Report Card features a variety of tabs including growth or value-added data, accountability, and education climate. A College and ... (click for more)

Chickamauga Lock To Reopen As Soon As Next Thursday

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District  plans to reopen Chickamauga Lock to all navigation traffic as early as next Thursday. An inspection of the upper gate anchorage and a repair plan were completed today. Chickamauga Lock closed on Monday after a routine inspection revealed a crack in the anchorage of the upper gate. Lt. Col. John Hudson, commander ... (click for more)

Downtown Chattanooga Apartment Complex That Brought $3 Million Profit Exempt From Most Taxes Until 2022 Under PILOT

A downtown Chattanooga apartment complex that recently was sold at a $3 million profit is exempt from most property taxes through 2022 under a PILOT (payment in lieu of taxes) agreement.   No payment of school taxes was included in the deal for Walnut Commons at Walnut Street and Aquarium Way.   The only taxes due on the property for the next eight ... (click for more)

A Vote For Education Is Critical In Tennessee

In a state where just 28 percent of eighth graders are proficient in math and 33 percent are proficient in reading according to national assessments, education is deserving of more attention in 2014 elections. Across the country, more parents are making informed decisions about their child’s education, but for Volunteer State parents without resources, choices are difficult to come ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: My Garden In November

As the first day of November arrives today, it is cold enough in my garden to officially certify that fall has fell! There are even signs of ice on the ground but there is a bounty crop of acorns so, in keeping with our monthly tradition, some will get shiny acorns and others will get a chunk of cold ice: A SHINY ACORN for Patriots football coach Bill Belichick for scoffing at ... (click for more)