Stanford Neurobiologist To Speak At Covenant College On Societal Changes From Biotechnology

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

William Hurlbut, M.D., will give a series of lectures on “Biotechnology, Christian Love, and the Human Future” at Covenant College on Feb. 13-15.

His lectures will examine the societal changes brought about through recent advances in biotechnology. From his standpoint as a neurobiologist and a Christian, Dr. Hurlbut will look beyond the physical ramifications of biotechnology and ask questions about the ways biotechnology influences the many facets of human existence.

A physician and consulting professor at the Neuroscience Institute at Stanford University, Dr. Hurlbut was appointed to the President’s Council on Bioethics in 2002. He has served with NASA and is a member of the Chemical and Biological Warfare working group at the Center for International Security and Cooperation.

Dr. Hurlbut received his undergraduate degree and medical training from Stanford University, where he went on to complete postdoctoral studies in theology and medical ethics. He is the author of numerous publications, including Altruism and Altruistic Love: Science, Philosophy, and Religion in Dialogue (Oxford University Press).

He is serving as guest speaker for the 2014 WIC Lecture Series, hosted by Covenant College and made possible by the generous support of the Women in the Church of the Presbyterian Church in America.

The lectures will be given at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 13 and Friday, Feb. 14 in the chapel at Covenant College.

In addition, Dr. Hurlbut will teach a related class from 6:30-10 p.m. on Feb. 13 and 14, and from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 15, in Brock Hall 118-122.

The WIC Lectures and classes are free and open to the public. 

The views expressed by Covenant-sponsored speakers and other college guests do not necessarily represent the views of Covenant College or its constituencies. 


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