State Archivists To Visit Cleveland In Search Of Civil War Memorabilia

Monday, March 10, 2014

Representatives from the Tennessee State Library and Archives and the Tennessee State Museum will be in Cleveland on Tuesday and Wednesday to record and digitize Civil War memorabilia owned by local residents for an exhibit titled "Looking Back: The Civil War in Tennessee."

Archivists will be at the Museum Center at 5ive Points, 200 Inman St. East in Cleveland, on Tuesday, from 2-6 p.m. and Wednesday, from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. During those times, they invite area residents to bring in original photographs, documents and other artifacts related to the Civil War.

The archivists will scan or take digital photographs of the materials, some of which will be featured in the exhibit, located online at www.tncivilwar150.org. The archivists will not actually take possession of the items from their owners.

Individuals may call 615 741-1883 or e-mail civilwar.tsla@tn.gov to schedule a reservation with the archivists. Reservation forms and available times may be found on the State Library and Archives' section of the Office of the Secretary of State web site at http://tn.gov/tsla/cwtn/cwtn_events.htm.

"This is an important project for the Tennessee State Library and Archives," Secretary of State Tre Hargett said. "The Civil War was a major event in our state's history, so we need to take appropriate steps to make sure these treasures are properly preserved for future generations."

Attendees at the event will receive copies of the digital photographs and tips on how to preserve their Civil War memorabilia.

Archivists plan to visit as many of Tennessee's 95 counties as possible in search of material for the exhibit, which commemorates the Civil War's 150th anniversary.


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