Program on U.S. Grant's Letters is March 22

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park invites the public to attend a special one-hour program on Saturday, March 22, 2014, at 11 am.  Join a park ranger at Point Park on historic Lookout Mountain to learn about and discuss Ulysses S. Grant’s wartime letters to his wife, Julia Dent Grant.  Visitors are encouraged to bring portable chairs for this program.  Meet the ranger inside the Point Park entrance gate. Admission to Point Park is $3.00 per adult, ages 16 and over; ages 15 and under enter free.

In an age with no email or cell phones, Civil War soldiers were forced to put pen to paper in order to communicate with their loved ones at home. Thus, Union General Ulysses S. Grant penned numerous letters to his wife, Julia, during the course of the war.  Interestingly, some of Grant’s letters were written during the fall of 1863 when he was stationed in Chattanooga.  We encourage you to come, learn about these letters that paint a picture of the general as a husband and a father, not as the often grizzled, cigar smoking fighter history portrays.

For more information about programs at Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, contact the Chickamauga Battlefield Visitor Center at (706) 866-9241, the Lookout Mountain Battlefield Visitor Center at (423) 821-7786, or visit the park’s website at www.nps.gov/chch.

 www.nps.gov

About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America’s 401 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.


 


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