Biographer To Lecture On Rosa Parks On March 7 At University Of The South

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Jeanne Theoharis of the City University of New York will give the 16th annual Anita S. Goodstein Lecture in Women's History at the University of the South. Ms. Theoharis is the author of The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks.

The public is invited to attend the lecture at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 27, in Gailor Auditorium on the Sewanee campus. It will be followed by a reception.

Ms. Theoharis’ compelling biography dispels, once and for all, the image of Ms. Parks as an apolitical, middle-aged lady who was too tired to give up her seat in a Montgomery bus. The Parks that Ms. Theoharis uncovers hailed from an activist family and had worked on civil rights and other issues, including efforts to stop sexual violence against black women, for decades. Theoharis also highlights the importance of Ms. Parks’s participation in a seminar at the Cumberland Plateau’s Highlander Folk School in her decision not to relinquish her seat. The biography is the first to examine Ms. Parks’s life after the bus boycott, a life that included death threats, unemployment, and a move to Detroit, where Ms. Parks continued her civil rights activism.

Ms. Theoharis is a professor of political science at the City University of New York’s Brooklyn College. Her areas of expertise include 20th-century African American history, the contemporary politics of race and gender, social policy and urban studies.

The lectureship was created in 1998 in recognition of Dr. Goodstein, who taught Sewanee’s first courses on race and on women, and who was one of the first women on Sewanee's faculty. Dr. Goodstein and her husband, Marvin, were also involved in desegregating Franklin county schools and other public venues in the area.



Tennessee National Guard Prepared If Need Arises During Eclipse

From Clarksville to Athens, Tennessee is at the epicenter of next week’s eclipse. With the eclipse comes thousands of visitors, and the Tennessee National Guard is well prepared. Guard Soldiers and Airmen will work with the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency to support local and state authorities as needed.  "This is part of the Guard’s dual mission, we not only fight ... (click for more)

Rotary District Governor Speaks At Rotary Club Of Chattanooga Hamilton Place

Rotary District 6780 Governor spoke at the Rotary Club of Chattanooga Hamilton Place this week.  Deborah Alexander-Davis addressed the club, discussed upcoming events, and thanked the club for donating over $399,000 to the Rotary Foundation.  Ms. Alexander-Davis also provided insights and encouragement regarding the Rotary's focus.   Rotary is dedicated to six ... (click for more)

Deborah Cox Of Graysville Dies After Wreck On Jones Gap Road

One person who was in critical condition after a wreck on Jones Gap Road has died. The victim was identified as Deborah Cox, of Graysville, Tn.  Hamilton County Sheriff's deputies, along with HCEMS and fire personnel, worked the accident near the 13,300 block of Jones Gap Road. Due to the crash, north and southbound Jones Gap Road were closed for a lengthy ... (click for more)

Excitement Builds As Tennessee Valley Prepares For Monday's Eclipse

Sandra Nicholson, director of the Edu-Care Daycare Center on Signal Mountain, is as ready for  Monday’s  historic solar eclipse as she’s ever going to be. It took some doing, she said, but she has finally enough pairs of NASA-certified solar safety glasses for everyone in her family.  She’s just one of the tens of thousands of Tennessee Valley area residents ... (click for more)

Mayor Invites Civil War II - And Response (18)

I just received an email from the Mayor stating that he filed paperwork to remove the city of Chattanooga as the trustee for the Confederate Cemetery on Third Street. I understand the Mayor's intent was to distance the city from it's racist past and subsequent hate, but I feel like this is an interesting move without much thought of the consequences. The Mayor prefaced his ... (click for more)

Roy Exum: The New Mean

Until last Monday I believed nobody could ever hurt my feelings again. In the half-century I have been a writer I’ve had hundreds of people take swipes at me, been called more names, and received more hate mail than you can imagine. I also know the only way anyone can hurt you is for you to allow it and, brother, it is nigh impossible to get inside me. My defense mechanism is because ... (click for more)